Find easy to sew, low-sew Halloween costume ideas!

Read on from guest blogger Jessica G on ideas for easy Halloween costumes.

Pattern Power! Pick out a costume pattern and go for it!

Halloween is lurking just around the corner. Show off your sewing skills by stitching up a quick costume. You may think there’s not enough time to finish a costume, but you have several factors in your corner. Use the following tips and inspiration to stitch up a Halloween costume pattern post haste!

Many Halloween costume patterns are designed to be completed quickly. The pattern drafter creates patterns with fewer pieces to shorten sewing time. Don’t be afraid to pull out the pattern instruction sheet and check how many pieces are involved in the pattern.

Photo1 e1413913091516 768x1024 Find easy to sew, low sew Halloween costume ideas!

This pattern has 18 pieces but only 9 are needed for the main costume, add in accessories such as a cape or eye mask if time allows

In addition to fewer pieces, many patterns have simple closures such as a single zipper, a drawstring waist or a minimal number of buttonholes. Scope out the pattern envelope back to see what notions are needed, you may be surprised at how few are necessary.

Photo2 1024x768 Find easy to sew, low sew Halloween costume ideas!

This pattern only requires a zipper.

Watch for patterns that say “Easy” or “One Hour” these can be stitched up in a hurry.

Photo3 1024x1024 Find easy to sew, low sew Halloween costume ideas!

These patterns declare how simple they are to sew

Avoid patterns that are historically accurate. Unless you’re planning to dress up as a Greek goddess in a toga or a cave woman in scraps of faux fur, historical costumes often require more time and attention to detail. Don’t limit your scope to just the Halloween costume options, take a gander at the non-costume patterns that are easier to sew.

Many costumes are all about accessories, create a red cape with a hood and in no time at all, you’re Red Riding Hood.

Photo4 e1413913972463 768x1024 Find easy to sew, low sew Halloween costume ideas!

This cape pattern is easy to sew and versatile as a costume.

Sew the hooded cape up in black and pair with a white mask and you’re the Phantom of the Opera. If you’re sewing for a little one, create fun and easy accessories to be paired with leotards and you’ll have a costumed side kick in no time.

Photo5 e1413913820328 768x1024 Find easy to sew, low sew Halloween costume ideas!

Capes, masks and belts can make a quick and fun costume for a wee
one

Once you’ve selected your pattern, scope out the recommended fabrics on the envelope back. Look for patterns made out of fabrics you’re comfortable sewing. Additionally, if a pattern calls for fleece, knits or felt, you won’t need to finish the seams. Fleece and felt will also keep you warm should you happen to live in a cooler climate.

Get inspired!

Use these fun patterns to stitch up a costume in no time!

The “Classic Cloak” from Sew it All vol. 2 would work nicely as a costume.

cloak full 682x1024 Find easy to sew, low sew Halloween costume ideas!Stitch up the cloak in Dalmatian spots, don a pair of long red gloves and a black and white wig and step out as Cruella De Ville. Cloaks are incredibly versatile, and this one is short and flirty. If Cruella isn’t your style, make it in black, pop some fangs in your mouth, wear a mysterious amulet on a red ribbon and haunt the night as Countess Dracula.

 Serge a “Darling Dress” from season 6 of Sew it All TV  for a  fun feminine costume.

DarlingDressfull size 596x1024 Find easy to sew, low sew Halloween costume ideas! Add a bit of fringe to the hem and wear it out with a flashy headband and you’re ready to hit the town as a Flapper. If the “Darling Dress” doesn’t strike your fancy make a fun and flirty knit dress from Craft Daily.   The neckline on this dress feels Greek, consider stitching this dress up in white, donning a gilded laurel headband and heading out the door as a Greek Goddess.

 If you have a little more time, consider sewing the Robson Coat pattern from shopsewitall.com. 1501 Sewaholic Robson 636x1024 Find easy to sew, low sew Halloween costume ideas! A trench coat is a great option for a costume, not only will it keep you warm but once Halloween night has been thoroughly haunted you’re left with a practical coat. Sew the coat in grey, pull on a pair of brown gloves and wear a grey fedora to go as Inspector Gadget. If you want to get really fancy, purchase a grabber and put a yellow glove on the end to poke out your sleeve as a gadget. Alternatively, this trench stitched up in khaki accompanied by a microphone prop and a hat with a press pass in it would make a great intrepid reporter costume.

Show us what you stitch up as a costume! Upload your costume picks to the Sew News Reader Flickr group! Have a Happy Halloween!

 

 

 

 

 

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Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & Construction

I think the Emily Bag is going to be in my top 5 tote bag sewing patterns. I'm a little behind in the sewing of it, (as usual) but I'll catch up. Hope everyone is enjoying the process. For more fantastic bag patterns and videos be sure to check out Craft Daily, with over 500 sewing and craft videos there a something for everyone. Let's have Rhonda get us going on week 3!!!

emily bag 6001 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & ConstructionNow that we’ve downloaded your pattern, chosen your fabrics and gathered all of your supplies, we can finally get started on putting the bag together!!

You will find that the bag is extremely easy to sew. The zippered pocket may seem a little intimidating, but I encourage you to give it a try. Just follow my instructions and be sure to try the zipper out on some scrap fabric before inserting it into your bag.

Once you have cut out all of your pieces and interfaced your lining, decide where you would like to place your zippered pocket. There is a marking on the pattern, but just consider this a guideline, as you can move it up or down just a bit depending on the length of your zipper. If you weren’t able to purchase a 5″ zipper, you will need to move the pocket down just a little so that the zipper doesn’t interfere with the seams of the side panels. One more thing to keep in mind is the magnetic clasp. You will need enough room between the top of the bag and the zipper to insert the clasp.

photo 211 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & Construction Once you have determined where to place the zipper, draw in a rectangle. The rectangle should be the length of your zipper and 1/2″ wide.

photo 22 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & Construction Stitch along the outside lines of the rectangle.

photo 23 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & Construction Now this is very important. Cut the rectangle open. Make sure that you cut in the middle and leave AT LEAST a 1/2″ “v” tab on either end.

photo 24 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & ConstructionMatch the edge of the zipper to the edge of the slit opening and be sure that the teeth of the zipper are in the middle of the opening of the slit. Sew the zipper to the bag, stitching along the guideline that was previously stitched in. Sew from one end of the rectangle to the other. Do not sew across the ends at this time. As you sew along, you will need to unzip the zipper in order to move the head of the zipper out of the way of your pressure foot. Be sure to use a zipper foot to sew your zipper into your bag.

photo 25 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & Construction Once both sides of the zipper have been sewn in, determine how deep you would like your pocket to be. 5″ is a nice depth. Cut a rectangle that is at least an inch longer than your zipper and twice the desired depth.

Match the right side of the fabric to the zipper and sew the pocket to the zipper.

photo 26 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & Construction Sew the other end of the pocket lining to the other side of the zipper. The inside of the pocket will have a beautifully finished look.

photo 27 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & Construction To finish the pocket, pull the “v” tabs out and lay them flat against the end of the zipper. Sew the seam. Be sure to sew exactly across the stitches on the tab. Once sewn, sew across the ends one last time to reinforce the ends of the zipper.

photo 28 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & Construction

photo 29 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & Construction  Congratulations! You now have a beautifully inserted zippered pocket.

If you would like, you may add a patch pocket to the other side of your bag. This is a very handy pocket, especially for cell phones.

Simply cut a rectangle the desired width that you would like your pocket to be. The length of the rectangle should be twice the desired length of your finished pocket. Place the right sides together and sew around the edges, leaving a small opening. Trim the seam if necessary, turn the pocket and press. Stitch along the end of the pocket with a double stitching line. This will keep the top edge of your pocket from stretching. Determine where the placement of the pocket and pin in place.

photo 30 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & Construction Edge stitch the pocket to the lining and then stitch a second row to reinforce the pocket.

photo 311 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & ConstructionOnce the pockets are in place, sew the side panels of the bag to the center panels. Seam allowances are 1/2″. Do not sew to the end of the panels. Leave 1/2″ open at the bottom of the bag. This will allow you to easily attach the bottom of the bag to the body of the bag.

photo 32 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & ConstructionSew the bottom of the bag to the body, sewing from point to point.

photo 33 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & ConstructionDo the same with the lining. Clip the intersection of the seams. This will remove all the bulk out of the corners.

photo 34 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & ConstructionThe outer bag has a lovely pleat at center front. The lining does not have the pleat. Pin pleat in place,

photo 35 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & Construction

and stitch in place to secure while putting the bag together.

photo 36 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & ConstructionFollow the instructions in the video for stitching the handles. Baste handles to the bag.

Screen Shot 2014 10 16 at 3.55.07 PM Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & Construction

Click on image to view Rhonda’s tutorial

Next week we will attach the magnetic closure and sew in the lining. Once the lining has been sewn in, we will add the feet and construct the hard bottom.

Be sure to visit the Flickr page and post your progress. I can’t wait to see how you’re doing!!

Rhonda Buss

Rhonda’s Creative Life

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Week 2: Emily Bag Sew Along – Fabric Choice & Supplies

Have you joined the Emily Bag Sew-Along? It’s such a great bag! It’s roomy and stylish and can fit just about anyone’s needs. This is our first e-pattern sew along so far. If you need any help in how to print out e-patterns please check out this tutorial on successful printing out of any e-pattern. Be sure to check out all the free bag patterns at Sew It All magazine for more inspiration. And, here’s Rhonda get started!

emily bag 600 Week 2: Emily Bag Sew Along   Fabric Choice & Supplies

Hopefully you have had a chance to download your Emily Bag Pattern from I Think Sew Patterns. As far as downloadable patterns goes, this is one of the easiest to download, so please don’t be intimidated.

Once you have downloaded the pattern, it’s time to think about your fabric choices. This pattern is very versatile. You can use quilting cottons, home dec fabrics, even faux and real leather.

I used a home dec weight fabric for the exterior of my first bag and a faux leather for the interior. The faux leather was also used for the bottom of the bag as well as the handles. Since both of the fabrics had quite a bit of weight to them and were quite stable, I did not interface the bag.

photo 131 Week 2: Emily Bag Sew Along   Fabric Choice & SuppliesThe second bag was made with the same home dec weight fabric for the exterior, but I used a quilting weight cotton for the interior. The interior fabric was interfaced with a fusible woven cotton interfacing.photo 141 Week 2: Emily Bag Sew Along   Fabric Choice & SuppliesFor the sew along, I wanted to give an idea I had a try. I’ve used fusible fleece in other projects and thought that I might like it in this project as well, and I was right!

Fusible fleece can be found at your local fabric store and it is made by Pellon. It does come in various weights. For this project I used a thin weight.

photo 151 Week 2: Emily Bag Sew Along   Fabric Choice & Supplies

The fusible fleece was used only on the interior fabric of the bag. The result was fabulous. Pictured below is the lining of my bag. It has enough body to stand on its own.

photo 161 Week 2: Emily Bag Sew Along   Fabric Choice & Supplies

The finished bag. For this bag, I used leather for the handles and the bottom of my bag.

photo 17 Week 2: Emily Bag Sew Along   Fabric Choice & Supplies

Something to keep in mind when choosing your fabrics. I had initially wanted to make a bag out of the patterned fabric pictured below. Once I began to cut the fabric, I realized that I did not have enough. I had enough yardage, but due to the pattern placement on the fabric, I would need twice the amount of fabric.

photo 18 Week 2: Emily Bag Sew Along   Fabric Choice & SuppliesAs I discussed last week, I made a hard bottom for my bag. I used chip board which can be found at an art supply store. Chip board comes in 2 weights, be sure to purchase the thicker board.

If you would like to add feet to your bag, they can be purchased at your local fabric store along with a magnetic closure. Touches like adding feet and including a magnetic closure will give your bag that high end look that we all love.

photo 19 Week 2: Emily Bag Sew Along   Fabric Choice & Supplies

Rhonda’s You-Tube Video

http://youtu.be/ijeb8-fOuP4

 

Next week we will begin sewing our bag together and we will also sew in the zippered pocket. Purchase a zipper that is no more than 7″ long. A 5″ zippered is ideal. A zipper with heavy metal teeth will also look wonderful inside your bag. A contrasting zipper might be fun too!

photo 20 Week 2: Emily Bag Sew Along   Fabric Choice & SuppliesSo, for this project, you will need;

  • FABRIC
  • 44″ wide heavyweight home decorator OR quilting weight cotton
    (1) Yard for exterior fabric
    (1) Yard for lining
  • - INTERFACING
    (2) Yards of 22″ wide medium weight fusible interfacing, or  (1) yard of fusible fleece
    - OTHERS
    (1) 18mm Magnetic Snap
    (1) Spool of coordinating thread
  • (1) 5″, 6″ or 7″ zipper
  • (4) purse feet
  • (1) heavy weight chip board
  • Matching Thread

Be sure to visit the Flickr page for the Emily Bag Sew Along and post your fabric choices. I think it’s especially fun to see the fabric choices prior to seeing the final project.

Once you make 1 of these bags, you will be making more. The first 2 that I made have been spoken for and I have a feeling that I won’t be keeping my third either!!! Everyone seems to love these bags. Isn’t it fun when we find a bag pattern that’s easy to make and looks great too?!!

Rhonda Buss

Rhonda’s Creative Life

 

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Craft Daily – Watch FREE this weekend – Learn how to make a knit dress

Love to sew, craft, knit or bead? Are you ready to learn more techniques and expand your knowledge? Please check out the latest risk-free offer from Craft Daily. We’re celebrating our 500th video and want you to get a chance to view amazing videos from top instructors around the country all for a risk-free trial.

IW CraftDailyFreeTrial 450x300 Craft Daily   Watch FREE this weekend   Learn how to make a knit dressVisit CraftDaily.com where you can have risk-free access to 500 videos on all kinds of sewing, quilting, mixed-media, and crafting techniques, now through October 13, 2014. Just enter the code CDFT500 after selecting the risk-free trial for your cart at checkout. Note: This is a Risk Free Trial.  Sign up now, then immediately log in and uncheck the ‘auto-bill option.’ You won’t be charged for anything and you’ll enjoy your full period of free access.

Screen Shot 2014 10 10 at 12.27.05 PM Craft Daily   Watch FREE this weekend   Learn how to make a knit dress

Watch a preview for how to Use a Serger to Make a Quick & Easy Knit Dress and you’ll get a sample of what you will learn in a video class. The Use a Serger to Make a Quick & Easy Knit Dress is just over an hour and shows you all that you will need in ways of supplies, tips expert guidance from June Mellingern on serging with knits. Plus a bonus project with Ellen March of Sew It All TV who will show you how easy it is to sew up a cute knit dress.

This risk-free trail offer at Craftdaily.com is available now through October 13. Your 5 days will begin as soon as you sign up any time between now and October 13.

Screen Shot 2014 10 10 at 11.51.33 AM Craft Daily   Watch FREE this weekend   Learn how to make a knit dress

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Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial – From Shannon Fabrics

Lisa Felthous Photography WC46 1024x731 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

This free tutorial written by Whimsy Couture .

These scarves feature Cuddle™ prints from Shannon Fabrics. For this neck warmer I used these prints:

Lead photo  Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabricsphoto 71 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon FabricsList of required materials:

  • Cuddle fabric
  • Satin fabric
  • Sewing machine
  • Scissors
  • Straight pins
  • Cutting mat
  • Rotary cutter
  • Vacuum or lint roller (sticky brush)
  • Basic sewing supplies, as needed

 

Seam allowance: 3/8” unless stated otherwise

Tip: when working with Cuddle fabric and Satin fabric you want to use LOTS of pins. Pin every inch for best results!

Sizing chart:

Cut the following measurements:

Age:

Cut 2x Cuddle fabric

Width x Length

Cut 2x Satin fabric

Width x Length

Teens

5”x17”

9.5×30”

Adults

6”x19”

11.5”x33”

These are the pieces you have cut out:

photo 31 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon FabricsTo make the satin ties, fold one of the satin pieces with right sides together, in half lengthwise:

photo 41 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

Pin along both long edges and one short side. Then sew in place using a short straight stitch (stitch length at 1.5-1.8 and tension at medium or 2-3). Backstitch the beginning and end:

photo 52 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

Repeat with second satin piece. Turn satin pieces with right sides out. This is what one piece will look like now:

photo 62 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

To sew the satin ties to the Cuddle fabric pieces:

Place one of the Cuddle fabric pieces with right side up in front of you and place one of the sewn satin ties onto the Cuddle fabric, aligning the open end with one of the Cuddle fabric piece sides:

photo 71 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon FabricsPlace second Cuddle fabric piece with right side down on top of the satin fabric. Pin in place and sew along the dashed lines as shown, leaving the other short side open. Make sure not to sew over the satin fabric inside the Cuddle fabric.

photo 81 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

Better view of the sewn piece with the satin tie reaching out:

photo 91 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

Clip corners off diagonally. Push the satin fabric all the way into the Cuddle fabric sleeve:

photo 101 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

Take your second satin fabric piece and insert it into the Cuddle fabric sleeve with the sewn short side first. At this time make sure that the seam of the satin ties face the same direction:

photo 111 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

Once fully inserted, align the open side of the satin fabric piece with the opening of the Cuddle fabric piece as shown:

photo 121 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

Pin the satin and Cuddle fabric together and leave a 3” opening as shown. Sew in place along the dashed lines. Backstitch the beginning and end by the opening:

photo 13 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

Carefully pull all fabrics through the opening so you will have the right sides shown.

 

To close the opening: photo 14 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

Fold both edges in and finger press the opening in place:

photo 15 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

With your machine close the opening along the dashed lines. Backstitch the beginning and end:

photo 16 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

All done!

You can find Shannon Fabrics Cuddle at your local fabric store or quilt shop. Here are a few stores across the country that carry a wide selection: Fabric Depot, Beverly’s Fabrics, and Mary Jo’s Cloth Store. You can also find Cuddle through many other online retailers.

Find Shannon Fabrics here:

Find Whimsy Couture ™ here:

 

photo 21 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

 

 

 

 

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Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today!

At Sew News we love bags. We love making them, using them and giving them as gifts. Generally they’re so easy to make and can be easily interpreted for different lifestyles, body shapes and personal needs. On the Sew News and Sew It All website we have a great assortment of bag patterns and projects. And, don’t forget to visit Craftdaily.com for even further instruction on making bags of all sorts and sizes.

emily bag 600 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! Today, we have a Rhonda Buss from Rhonda’s Creative Life starting our sew along for the Emily Bag from iThinksew. Today Rhonda will walk us through the pattern and discuss e-Patterns. At the end of today’s post there will be a short video as well as a link to a tutorial for printing out e-patterns. Enjoy! And don’t forget to post on Flickr as we sew-along.

The Emily Bag is one that everyone can use in their wardrobe. Perfect for the mom on the go, the student as well as anyone who needs a stylish bag to carry their things in to and from work.

 

The bag lends itself to lots of fabric combinations. It can be made with home dec fabrics, lined with cottons or as in the example, a faux leather.

photo 1 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! photo 2 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! During the sew along, I will show you how to insert a zippered pocket. photo 3 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! We will also attach a patch pocket, perfect for quick and easy access of your cell phone. photo 4 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! We will add feet to the bottom,

photo 5 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! and I will show you how to add a removable hard bottom.

photo 6 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! The Emily bag pattern is a PDF pattern, which means you will need to download the pattern and print it at home or the copy shop. I call this instant gratification, because as soon as I pay for the pattern, I am able to instantly print it and start working on it immediately!

If you have never used a PDF pattern, this is a great one to start with as there are only 6 sheets of paper to the pattern. A few things to keep in mind when printing your pattern. Be sure that your printer is set to not scale the pattern. Choose the “actual size” option.

Once you have printed the pattern, simply tape the pieces together. Each pattern piece for this pattern has only one taped seam. Please pay close attention to the pattern pieces as you may tape over some of the instructions as I did in the example below. If you look closely, you’ll see that I taped over the instructions to cut 2 lining pieces. When I cut my first bag, I spent a good deal of time trying to figure out what I had done wrong with the lining until I discovered that I had not cut out 2 pieces!photo 7 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! For this pattern, you will need to draft out 2 pattern pieces. This is VERY simple to do as both pieces are just rectangles.

For the purse bottom, draw out a rectangle that measures 13″ wide, by 7″ tall.photo 8 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! The instructions state to cut the handle 4″ wide by 10″ long. I found the length of the handle to be a little short for my comfort of wearing the bag on my shoulder. So when I made the second bag, I lengthened the handle to 12″ long. This worked out quite well.photo 8 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! photo 9 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! When I print out the instructions sheets for a pattern, I like to put them into book form. It helps to keep all the sheets together and I can easily flip through the pages as I work. Simply stack the pages and then staple along the edge. To save a little on my ink, or printing costs, I always print the instructions out in black and white.

photo 10 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! I think you will especially enjoy this pattern. I have decided to make 2 during the sew along, one as a tote for my groceries out of these fun vegetable prints,

photo 11 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! and the other out of a faux leather and this great print.

photo 12 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! So download the pattern and get your materials ready. This is a bag that you will enjoy and it will make fabulous Christmas presents. I can’t imagine anyone not wanting one of these bags!!

http://youtu.be/En8ZqhgCLXE

Here is a tutorial on printing e-Patterns from the Sew News blog.

Be sure to check out the Emily Bag Sew Along Flickr group and post your fabric choices as well as your progress. I can’t wait to see your fabric combinations! I think this is going to be an especially fun sew along!!

Rhonda Buss

www.rhondabuss.blogspot.com

 

 

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Learning to Sew Structured Bags + A Free Bag Project

I love making bags. It’s nice to sew something that doesn’t require fitting and I can get done in an afternoon or so. But, it’s funny because with so many bags that I make I still manage to carry my projects around in plastic grocery bags!

Here is a favorite knitting bag I made a while back. This is from vintage bark cloth I found at an antique store in South Dakota. On this one I just drafted a pattern to fit the handles and lined in a raspberry taffeta for a little luxe feel to it.

photo5 Learning to Sew Structured Bags + A Free Bag ProjectSimple to make, a pleasure to carry.

As the weather turns to cooler temps I need something a little bit more autumnal, and with more pockets and structure. Structured bags are great for tote bags, messenger bags and even diaper bags. Sewing structured bags is an easy step up from your basic tote bag making. You learn how to use hardware, interfacing and inserting a lining. Plus adding piping and feet to the bottom of the bag makes any bag look straight out of better department stores.

Have you tried making structured bags? If you need guidance from an expert check out new videos from Craftdaily.com on how to make a great tote bag. In “Part 2: Bag Savvy” award winning designer and author Linda McGehee shows how easy it is to make professional looking bags by using her time tested techniques.

I love watching Linda McGehee talk and sew bags. She’s engaging, passionate and knows her stuff.

In Part 2 you’ll learn the ins-and-outs of:

  • Padded shoulder straps
  • Chain application
  • Corded piping
  • Sew-in magnetic snaps
  • Installing internal and external hardware
  • Bag feet
  • Pockets and placement
  • Choosing the right interfacing

Part 1: Bag Savvy Linda shows you all the ins-and-outs of sewing unstructured bags. In this video you’ll learn how to:

  • Sew a zipper into a bag
  • Fix the zipper on a bag if mistakes are made during bag construction
  • Sew a mitered edge on a zipper once it is sewn onto the bag
  • Make a mitered bottom for a bag
  • Measure for bias binding using the width of your bag and sew it on properly
  • Apply various stitches that look great when finishing bias binding
  • Add straps to bags securely
  • And more!

After you have learned all about making structured and unstructured bags take your knowledge for a test drive and sew this very roomy and structured bag from Rashida Coleman-Hale in Sew It All TV’s episode 510. You can get all the instructions  and start making your own roomy tote.

rashida450 Learning to Sew Structured Bags + A Free Bag Project

Check ‘em out and let me know what you made!

Jill

 

 

 

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My sewing room looks like…..

What’s your sewing space look like? If anyone answers with the words blitzkrieg, hoarder, crazy fabric lady or “I lost my Chihuahua Frankie in there” then we’ve got a solution for you.

Sew News is happy to help those who may have a fabric stash management problem. No judging here. Honestly, if anyone saw my sewing space right now, there might be a call to the National Guard (and lucky you can get a glimpse below).

At any rate for those that want to manage their stash better so that you can actually see and then ultimately use their fabric, there is a fantastic webinar aptly titled, Stash Management 101: How to Tame, Love, and Use Your Fabric Collection.

stashmanagement1013 My sewing room looks like.....

The Details!

  • When: October 7, 2014
  • Where: Online
  • Time: 1-2pm ET
  • Cost: $19.99

What you will learn

Laura Stone Roberts contributing editor at McCalls Quilting will show you how to manage your fabric tiger. Even if you are a veteran procrastinator or have only a small amount of time to devote to managing your stash, Laura will address topics like:

  • How to find the time and motivation to tackle your stash.
  •  How to assess your sewing area and your goals for it.
  • Tips for deciding what to keep and what to part with.
  • Ways to re-distribute your unwanted items that will make you feel good.
  • How to assess your storage needs and meet those needs on any budget.
  • And so much more!

Can’t make the live event? Don’t worry! Your registration comes with access to the archived version of the program and the materials for one year.

Okay, so you want to see what some of my fabric stash looks like? Here you go. Oh, you think you can do better? Game on. Post what your fabric stash looks like on our Sew News Reader Flickr Group. And, if you take the webinar post a pic of your sewing room or fabric stash after! I dare ya!

9536159420 ded37a6243 o My sewing room looks like.....

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A Tutorial on how to use e-Patterns

There’s no denying that e-Patterns for sewing, quilting and crafting are here to stay. They offer the chance to get many patterns for free as well as present to you new styles that you may not have considered before or wanted to pay for. At Sew News we offer e-Patterns with almost every issue. However with a few changes recently in software and technology sometime downloading these e-Patterns isn’t always so clear cut as it once was.

e pattern image copy A Tutorial on how to use e Patterns

Today’s tutorial will attempt to make the process of getting these e-Patterns hassle free.

All of our e-Patterns are offered on our websites – Sew News, Creative Machine Embroidery and Sew It All.

We’ll use the Sew It All site as the example. But, the steps will remain the same regardless of whatever website. Please note this tutorial is for downloading sewing e-patterns, not for embroidery design downloads, that will be addressed later.

Step 1

Click on to the article that contains the pattern. There will be a link to the pattern as well as a reference guide for printing out e-Patterns.

Sometimes the pattern will come in two or more links. But, each link will be clearly marked as such.

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Step 2

Right click on to the link and a dialogue box will pop up on your screen.

Screen Shot 2014 09 22 at 11.35.12 AM A Tutorial on how to use e Patterns

Step 3

Click on to the “Save Link As…” option.

Screen Shot 2014 09 22 highlight A Tutorial on how to use e Patterns

Step 4

When you click the “Save Link As…” a dialogue box will open from your computer. This is where you can save the e-Pattern to any location on your computer’s hard drive. You can even rename the file to something else.

Screen Shot 2014 09 22 at 11.44.55 AM A Tutorial on how to use e Patterns

Step 5

Open up Adobe Reader. This is a free software program that you can download if you don’t already have it on your computer.

While in Adobe Reader retrieve the e-Pattern from where ever you saved it.

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And open it. The e-Pattern will be visible in the screen. Mouse over to the “File” tab and go to “Print”.

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Step 6

The Print Dialogue box will now be visible in your screen. Your screen may not look exactly like mine but the box should have the word “Print” on it.

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Step 7

These next steps are very important for printing out the pattern correctly.

  1. While in the Print Dialogue box, select “Poster” under “Page Sizing & Handling”.
  2. Check that “Cut Marks” and “Labels” are selected.
  3. Check that “Documents and Markups” is selected under the “Comments & Forms”.

Screen Shot 2014 09 22 at 12.19.19 PM A Tutorial on how to use e Patterns You can see towards the right of the box it will show how the pattern is laid out and how many pages. e-Patterns can take a lot of pages to print, just as regular commercial or store bought patterns use large sheets of paper for their patterns. It’s the nature of the beast.

If you do not want to use your toner and printer to do this, download the e-Pattern on to a thumb drive and take it to your local copy shop where they can print it out accordingly.

Step 8

Laying out the e-Pattern

When you print out the e-Pattern guide that is located along with the e-Pattern there will be a guide as to how to lay out and tape the pattern together.

It will look like this.

PrintingInstructions 1024x780 A Tutorial on how to use e Patterns Every page that is printed will have a series of numbers and title of the pattern

page and cut mark 1024x448 A Tutorial on how to use e Patterns and, what is known as “Cut Marks” (circled in blue below).

cut marks 1024x579 A Tutorial on how to use e Patterns After you have followed the numbering sequence your pages will look something like this. But, you’re not done!

photo3 e1411412324901 768x1024 A Tutorial on how to use e Patterns You must overlap the cut marks. As you will notice below, I have overlapped the left side and the right side of the pattern is not overlapped at the cut marks. Once you have over lapped at all the cut marks you would then tape the pattern together. After it is all tapped you can opt to copy the pattern on to pattern paper, Swedish tracing paper or other type of pattern paper.photo 311 e1411412504717 768x1024 A Tutorial on how to use e Patterns

I hope this helps! There are a lot of steps, but once you get the hang of it it’s a great way to get free and low cost sewing patterns. If you have any questions please leave them in the comment section below.

Jill

Posted in E-patterns | Tagged , | 3 Comments

Clover Pant Sew Along Week 4 – Finishing

I’ve got to admit, I’m a little behind in the pant sew along (insert rimshot). But, I am eager to finish up this week and post my progress on Flickr. How is everyone doing? It’s nice that we have an entire week to move from one area to the next.

If you are as addicted to sewing pants as I am you’ll love the new series we have with Rae Cumbie on craftdaily.com. In this series she shows you the important elements of pant fitting. Plus, be sure to check out Rae in the latest issue of Sew News. You can still get the Oct/Nov 2014 on newsstands or at shopsewitall.com.  Now let’s get back now to the final stage of our pant fitting sew along. Here’s Rhonda!

PatternCover 5001 Clover Pant Sew Along Week 4   Finishing

We are in the final stretch of finishing our pants! Last week we sewed in the zipper and attached the yoke. This week we will line the yoke, attach a hook and hem our pants.
Sew the facing to the yoke. Once the facing is sewn in place, lay the yoke and facing flat and edge stitch the facing seam. This will help to hold the facing in place and it will also help to keep the waistline seam from stretching.

photo 32 Clover Pant Sew Along Week 4   Finishing

There are a number of methods that can be used to finish the edge of the yoke facing, but one of my favorite methods is to use a piece of purchased bias tape. Simply open the folded edge of the bias tape and stitch one side to the edge of the yoke facing. Once sewn in place, press and then roll the tape over the edge and stitch in the ditch.

photo 33 Clover Pant Sew Along Week 4   Finishing Press the facing and then pin the facing to the pant. To attach the facing, stitch in the ditch. Be careful when stitching in the pocket area to hold the top portion of the pocket away from the presser foot while you are sewing the facing in place.

photo 34 Clover Pant Sew Along Week 4   Finishing The facing is now sewn to the back of the yoke and the edge of the facing is nicely finished.

photo 35 Clover Pant Sew Along Week 4   Finishing The final step in finishing the facing is to turn back the facing along the zipper. Stitch in place by hand.

photo 36 Clover Pant Sew Along Week 4   Finishing Attach a hook. I like to do a buttonhole stitch around my hooks. It makes for a beautiful finish.

photo 37 Clover Pant Sew Along Week 4   Finishing Rather than use the eye that is provided in the package, I like to do a thread loop.

photo 38 Clover Pant Sew Along Week 4   Finishing The finished hook and loop.

photo 39 Clover Pant Sew Along Week 4   Finishing Finishing the edge of the pocket can be a little tricky, but a simple finish can be done with a pair of pinking shears.

photo 40 Clover Pant Sew Along Week 4   Finishing The final step in finishing the pants is to hem them. I like to cut a bias strip of my fabric to finish the edge of my pant leg. Simply sew it on just as you would with a piece of purchased bias tape.

photo 41 Clover Pant Sew Along Week 4   Finishing Hem the pant leg with a catch stitch.

photo 42 Clover Pant Sew Along Week 4   Finishing

This is the third pair of Clover pants that I have made and each has a slightly different fit primarily because each has been made out of a different fabric. So be aware that depending upon your fabric choice, your pants will have a slightly different fit.
I will be posting my final pair to the Flickr page. This will not be the final pair that I will be making.

Be sure to check out the video portion of this week’s sew along.

I’ve really enjoyed the Clover pant pattern and I hope you have as well!
Rhonda Buss
www.rhondabuss.blogspot.com

Posted in Sew Along - Clover Pant | Tagged , | 2 Comments