Wardrobe Planning Tips from Rachel Pinheiro

We have been inspired by all the handmade wardrobe planning tips from our favorite sewing designers and bloggers this year, and this issue’s installment – from Rachel Pinheiro – was no exception.

By Rachel Pinheiro of House of Pinheiro

(Read the full article in the June/July issue of Sew News.)

IMG 2948 682x1024 Wardrobe Planning Tips from Rachel Pinheiro

Developing Your Personal Style

Going down the rabbit-hole of personal style has been a fun journey. I love thinking about fabrics, shapes, moods. I’m a visual person. I need to draw, collect fabric, create inspirational boards and test ideas on a daily basis. When asked how I have created a body of work with such a strong sense of personal style, I tend to say that I pick things that I love. Instead of categorizing what I wear on a recognizable formula, such as classic, modern, etc., I follow three directives.

Does it make me feel powerful in my own skin?

Is it comfortable to wear?

Do I know where I’m going when wearing it?

Another useful tool is categorizing my whole wardrobe, including my sewing plans and what I buy (new or vintage), as individual functioning elements. Everything in my wardrobe is categorized as either a foundation, key or statement piece.

Foundations are the clothes I pair with my key pieces when I want to look more casual. These garments are usually a bit more generic and offer a starting point, functioning as an outfit basic. Use this type of clothing to introduce new color palettes, trends, seasonal fabrics or specific trend details. For example, I love wearing turtlenecks during autumn and winter, so I continually introduce new fabric textures and colors, in addition to trying different sewing patterns. Sometimes I will have a turtleneck substitute project, such as a sweater pattern. I usually know how and when I will wear each item.

The key pieces are the workhorses of my wardrobe. I try to keep the fabric choices of the highest quality as those garments are meant for longevity, worn over and over again. For key pieces, I try to stay within my favorite neutral colors for maximum wearability. I will often sew key shapes and lengths that cannot be dated easily, such as a pair of tailored wool trousers or leather circle skirt. For these items, avoid using trends as inspiration.

Statement pieces are one-off items with wow factor. The clothes allow me to explore design concepts and interesting construction methods or use really precious fabric. Or make a labor-intensive couture dress using traditional chita (cheap folk fabric from Brazil) just because I felt this was the perfect birthday party outfit. My statement pieces usually incorporate trends and unusual fabrics.

IMG 6355 300x300 Wardrobe Planning Tips from Rachel Pinheiro

I don’t know anyone that doesn’t have a few uniforms, or tried and tested matches. I navigate my different outfit formulas by toning it down (foundation + key piece) or toning it up (key piece + statement). My personal goal is balance those three elements well to fit within my lifestyle and my desire to create. Using this system, the same sewing pattern is easily adapted to any of the three categories depending of my most immediate needs. I satisfy my creative side by infusing my sewing with a directive to maintain a good wearable closet. I don’t intend to only wear handmade. Sewing a really standard basic white knit tee will rarely be on my plans, but identifying where my wardrobe is lacking makes me a conscientious buyer.

 

 Wardrobe Planning Tips from Rachel Pinheiro
Posted in Fashion | Tagged | Leave a comment

Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 2: Side Slit, Tie Band, and Hem

In part 2 of our Cap Sleeve (Plus Size) Blouse Sew Along with Meg Healy from from BurdaStyle.com we are going to cover the peplum portion of the blouse with side seam slits for the tie bands. You can get the pattern here with additional help and video tutorial to complete this figure-flattering wrap blouse just in time for the summer heat!

Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along MAIN Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 2: Side Slit, Tie Band, and Hem
Last week  we ended off part 1 of the sew-along by attaching the front bands to finish the crossover neckline edges of the blouse. This week grab your bodice peplum/skirt pieces and we will put it all together.

Insert image:
Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along PT 2 sprout

We also talked about how you can totally customize your plus size blouse through Sprout and also have your pattern’s size line directly printed onto different types of fabric! Remember to use code SEWCAPSLV (one discounted blouse per customer) to receive 15% off your blouse. Start designing here.

For more information on the fabrics, sizing, and customizing – refer back to part 1.

Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along PT 2 STEP 1 300x199 Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 2: Side Slit, Tie Band, and Hem

Step 1

Step 1: Place your bodice pieces, right sides together matching up the side seams. On the left side seam only stitch to the notch indicated on the pattern. Make sure you serge or zig zag-finish your side seam edges first before you sew.

Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along PT 2 STEP 2 300x199 Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 2: Side Slit, Tie Band, and Hem

Step 2

Step 2: Press your side seam allowances open on your bodice, and around the slit simply press the edges to the wrong side as pictured so the pressed slit edges align with the seamline.

Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along PT 2 STEP 3 300x199 Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 2: Side Slit, Tie Band, and Hem

Step 3

 Step 3:
Pin and stitch the peplum/skirt pieces of the blouse, right sides together from the waistline to hem. Press seam allowances open.

Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along PT 2 STEP 4 300x199 Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 2: Side Slit, Tie Band, and Hem

Step 4

Step 4:
Lay the bodice on the peplum/skirt along the waistline, right sides together. Match up the side seams (for the slit, make sure the pressed edge match up) and center back, and also the finished crossover neckline with the notch. Note: the peplum/skirt pieces will extend beyond the bodice.

Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along PT 2 STEP 5 300x149 Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 2: Side Slit, Tie Band, and Hem

Step 5

Step 5:
Sew the bodice to the peplum/skirt backstitching at the finished neckline edges, then serge-finish the entire waistline seam including the extensions.

Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along PT 2 STEP 6 300x199 Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 2: Side Slit, Tie Band, and Hem

Step 6

Step 6:
Fold each tie band lengthwise with right sides to­gether and press. Then stitch the long edge and one short end. Trim the seam allowances and clip the corner. Turn each tie band right side out and topstitch.

Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along PT 2 STEP 7 300x199 Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 2: Side Slit, Tie Band, and Hem

Step 7

Step 7:
Place each tie band on the peplum/skirt pieces matching up the edges. Baste the tie bands to the blouse along the outer edge as well as the notched fold line where the bodice is sewn.

Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along PT 2 STEP 8 300x199 Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 2: Side Slit, Tie Band, and Hem

Step 8

Step  8:
Press the peplum/skirt pieces along the notched fold line and flip to the wrong side – the tie bands will extend out.

Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along PT 2 STEP 9 300x199 Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 2: Side Slit, Tie Band, and Hem

Step 9

Step 9:
View from the open fold from the wrong side of the blouse. While the extension is open press up the hem allowance.

Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along PT 2 STEP 10 300x199 Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 2: Side Slit, Tie Band, and Hem

Step 10:
Fold back the extension and topstitch the hem in place.

If you want instructor help sewing together this blouse with an additional video tutorial, then you can register here (https://academy.burdastyle.com/courses/sprout-patterns-presents-cap-sleeve-blouse-plus-size) for a more in depth look constructing this pattern.

Tune in next week where I’ll be going over the final steps in making this blouse, and don’t forget to use code SEWCAPSLV for 15% off on Sprout (good until June 30th 2018). Get yours here!

 

CAP SLEEVE BLOUSE SEW ALONG PART 1

 Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 2: Side Slit, Tie Band, and Hem
Posted in Sew Along - BurdaStyle Cap Sleeve Blouse | Tagged | Leave a comment

Common Threads 2018 Recap

13 manniquin back e1528816486399 202x300 Common Threads 2018 Recap

50th Anniversary gown at the Tacony Achievement Center

For the past five years, Baby Lock has held its Common Threads event in June, bringing together bloggers, editors and industry insiders who share a love of sewing, quilting and/or embroidery. This year, I was lucky enough to be the Sew News/Creative Machine Embroidery representative to the event.

I had heard great things about Common Threads, and I was excited to experience it for myself. It began with a brief meet-and-greet leading into a few words from the wonderful people at Tacony and an introduction to the staff who would be making our next few days absolutely magical through their hard work.

Next we had the sewing version of speed dating — half of us on the inside of a ring of tables, half on the outside, and three minutes to converse with the person across from you before the bell rang and the circle rotated. It was surprisingly fun; sometimes you talked about yourself, sometimes you talked about them, sometimes you discovered that they were a quilter and you were a garment sewist and then you spend the next three minutes talking about your favorite Broadway musicals. I met a lot of interesting people who I was excited to get to know better over the next few days… but was my voice ever tired by the time we went all the way around the circle!

babylock ct Common Threads 2018 RecapAfter dinner we normally would have had an open sew, but instead we did some prep work for our first class the next day — drafting leggings to your own measurements. The drafting wasn’t complicated, per se (the quilters might not have agreed!), but it took some time and a little math, so we wanted to get it done so the next day could be about sewing and fitting. We did have a little open sew time at the end of the evening, but most of us were worn out and headed off to bed. A good thing, too, because the next day was packed!

(At this point I should probably mention that I was so overwhelmed the first day that I failed to take a single photo! I managed better the second day.)

2 knit fabric e1528816281619 196x300 Common Threads 2018 Recap

Bolts of Riley Blake knits for making leggings

We were all excited for the rest of our leggings class, so we got into it a little before the official start time of 9:00. Riley Blake fabrics had sent a whole stack of lovely knit prints for the purpose, and we each got to choose our favorites to cut our leggings out of. I chose a fun circle print on teal.

3 my fabric e1528816323267 150x150 Common Threads 2018 Recap

My leggings fabric

I’ve made leggings before, so I wasn’t worried as I sewed my seams, but to my surprise, my made-to-measure leggings were way too big. Turns out that it’s a terrible mistake to take leg measurements while wearing wide-legged pants. I thought I had compensated, but I was very wrong. I retook my measurements later and most of the original set were too big by at least an inch! Luckily our amazing teachers, Zede and Mallory Donohue, worked with me to adjust them and I was able to salvage the leggings with a lot of trimming and some aggressive elastic at the waist. I’m going to redraft the pattern with the retaken measurements and try again. In the meantime, I got to sew on the Baby Lock Triumph, and let me tell you, it was hard to go back to my regular serger after that smooth-as-satin serging and coverlock experience.

1 cutting leggings e1528816228895 225x300 Common Threads 2018 Recap

Incredibly efficient leggings cutting station

5 leggings wall e1528816354108 210x300 Common Threads 2018 Recap

Finished leggings hanging on display

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After a tasty lunch we had an influencer panel with Pat Sloan, Christopher Thompson and Miranda Anderson. The theme for the session (and the overall event) was community, and all three had some really great insights on building and staying connected to a community online.

9 heart block e1528816394865 300x291 Common Threads 2018 Recap

My heart block. Not too shabby!

Then it was time for our charity project, which was also our quilting project. This is the one that made me nervous, because piecing isn’t my strong suit and I wasn’t sure I could keep up. Luckily I was sitting with Lori Baker and Jean Nolte, both quilting experts, and they kept me on the straight and narrow 1/4”. I even ended up with my directional print all going the same way, which was pretty much a miracle!

12 smile bag e1528816442661 297x300 Common Threads 2018 Recap

My completed Smile Bag

We made Smile Bags for Operation Smile, which repairs cleft lips and cleft palettes for children in developing countries. The Smile Bags are packed with toys and other things to keep the children’s spirits up while they recover from the surgery. Ours were pieced around a heart block, which turned out to be pretty easy once I understood how it was going together. And I got my seams lined up just about perfectly! I should probably give credit to the Destiny II machine I was working on, but I think some of it was my skills as well. I also got to use the Triumph again to make a drawstring with an attachment that worked like a bias tape maker to fold under the edges of a strip and coverlock them in place. Very cool!

11 drawstring e1528816417846 225x300 Common Threads 2018 Recap

Drawstring made on the Baby Lock Triumph

After we finished our bags they sent us back to the motel to rest up for our mystery event that night. We were asked to wear cocktail attire, and I must say we all looked pretty snazzy. I wore the silk dupioni LBD I made for the December/January issue of Sew News. It’s from a sundress pattern, so perfect for the hot weather we were having.

Opera bus e1528816641127 225x300 Common Threads 2018 Recap

The only picture I took that night (oops!), taken to prove to my husband that I was wearing my seatbelt on the bus.

There’s a group picture every year at Common Threads — I think it’s usually on the last day, but since we were all dressed up we took advantage of it. Afterwards, we got our surprise: We were going to appreciate some costume design at the Opera Theater of St. Louis as we watched a performance of La Traviata!

It was an amazing experience. The performers were great, the costumes were amazing and the company couldn’t be beat. It was an incredibly special opportunity, and I feel so lucky to have been able to have it.

Also, operas are long, so I was really glad I decided to do most of my packing during the downtime that afternoon!

20 Embroidery selfie e1528816559520 257x300 Common Threads 2018 Recap

Embroidery selfie!

The last day was bittersweet. Nicci Brazzell taught us to create our own quilted in-the-hoop fabric bowls on the Destiny II. While I have access to that particular machine at work, I had never really used the IQ Designer, but Nicci made it seem easy and I’m planning to spend some time playing around and discovering if it really is that easy or if her expertise just made it seem easy!

21 Bowl e1528816601618 300x228 Common Threads 2018 Recap

My snap-corner ITH embroidery-quilted fabric bowl

We were all sad to leave (there were a few tears as the event wound down), but Baby Lock has a few more surprises for us attendees — and for our followers — to draw it out a little more. Keep an eye out for more information on that!

 

I’m really grateful to have had the opportunity to attend this event, and I hope I’ll get to go back someday. Everyone at Tacony worked so hard to give us a great experience and to make sure that we learned, played, laughed, made new friends and left feeling like a part of a supportive, ever-growing community.

 Common Threads 2018 Recap
Posted in Events | Leave a comment

Summer Fabric Series: Tips for Sewing with Sheers

It’s summertime, so bring on all the silky, drapey, flowy fabric goodness. Silk, crepe de chine, chiffon, lawn, voile – these fabrics are among our faves, but they can be intimidating and tricky to work with. This week, we continue our summer fabric series with a focus on cutting and sewing sheers.

colorful fabrics SHEERS Summer Fabric Series: Tips for Sewing with Sheers

by Linda Reynolds

(Full article appears in Sew News June/July 2017.)

Silk charmeuse, crepe de chine, chiffon, organdy, lawn, voile and most synthetic linings are examples of fabrics that typically fall into the sheer to very lightweight category. As such, they share a long list of attributes that makes sewing with them a challenging prospect. Their soft, flowy nature means they slip and slide all, making pattern layouts, cutting, general handling and machine sewing difficult. Additionally, these types of fabrics tend to fray excessively, so raw edges must be treated and seams finished.

When working with such flimsy fabrics, you should know what to expect and have a plan for dealing with these characteristics at every stage of the construction process. That means gathering the appropriate tools to prevent damaging the fabric and employing some simple sewing techniques that will make working with these fabrics less frustrating.

Cutting Tips
The slippery, shifting nature of lightweight fabrics is most pronounced when it comes to the pattern layout and cutting stages of construction. For the most accurate cuts, it’s best to cut patterns out one layer at a time, so be prepared to draft mirror image copies of pattern pieces cut on the fold. Setting the grainlines for proper layouts and cutting are particularly challenging, as getting unruly fabrics to lay flat and square is difficult. Before laying out, choose a technique to help stabilize the fabric on the work surface.

A grid-marked cutting mat is especially effective, as the fabric’s cross grain and selvage edges can be lined up to the lines of the mat to render it square. Once square, hold the fabric in place with pattern weights or other small weighted objects. No cutting mat? Use an L-square ruler to help line up the cross grain and selvage edges.

Another way to stabilize the fabric is to sandwich a layer of tissue paper between the work surface and the fashion fabric. The pattern pieces are then pinned through the tissue paper, which helps to reduce the amount of slippage and produces more accurately cut patterns.

Screen Shot 2018 06 13 at 1.59.26 PM Summer Fabric Series: Tips for Sewing with Sheers

Sewing Tips for Sheers
Lightweight fabrics can either bunch up or the fabric sinks into the needle plate at the start of stitching. Fortunately, there are some easy ways to prevent these problems from occurring in the first place.

Don’t backstitch to lock the start of a seam. Instead, reduce the stitch length to 1.5mm and stitch the first 1⁄4” of the seam at this setting while at the same time gently pulling the thread tails away from the machine. Once past the 1⁄4” mark, return the stitch length to the normal setting. Then reduce the stitch length again at the end of the seam to secure it in place. The tiny stitches will sufficiently secure the seam at both ends without any bunching or added bulk and will prevent the fabric from sinking into the needle plate.

Pin a small piece of tissue paper under the seam so it extends beyond the cut edge. Begin sewing on the tissue paper. Once the needle transitions to the fabric, stitch a 1⁄4” or so, then sew a few backstitches to lock the seam. Complete the rest of the seam in the usual manner. The tissue paper supports the underside of the seam, preventing it from sinking into the needle plate and any backstitching from bunching up. For added stability, consider using a tissue strip under the full length of the seam. Simply tear it away when the seam is complete.

Use a stitch starter. This is nothing more than a small piece of scrap fabric of the same weight that acts as a running board. Begin the seam by stitching on the stitch starter. When close to the edge, slide the fashion fabric against it. Continue stitching, transitioning onto the fashion fabric. Once on the fashion fabric, sew a few backstitches to lock the seam and proceed as normal. When the seam is complete, snip the stitch starter away from the fashion fabric.

Use a single-needle presser foot and/or a single-hole needle plate. One or both will reduce the risk of the fabric sinking into the needle plate. The single-hole needle plate will add stability to the underside of the fabric, which also helps produce straighter seams. Its only drawback is that the needle must always be in the center position.

 

 Summer Fabric Series: Tips for Sewing with Sheers
Posted in Tips & Techniques | Tagged | Leave a comment

Shorts Sewing Pattern Roundup: Our Top Picks

Whether you’re super into shorts or not, in some climates, they’re a must for summer. Shorts are perfect for testing pants patterns (and many patterns include them as an option), they don’t often require a large amount of fabric and you can likely sew a pair from your stash. Plus, they’re perfect in a variety of fabrics, from sporty knits to structured twill to softer canvas, linen and more.

shorts pattern review post Shorts Sewing Pattern Roundup: Our Top Picks

Pattern Round Up: Shorts

They might not be the most glamorous thing in your wardrobe – though some are surprisingly sophisticated – but if they’ll get worn and/or you need a pair for warm weather, that’s reason enough to sew them. Read on for more about our favorite shorts sewing patterns. Any of your favorites not on the list? Please add them in the comments!

Breezy
If you’re headed to the beach, or lucky enough to live there, breezy linen shorts might be your best bet.

No secret that we’re a big fan of the Emerson Crop Pants by True Bias (see our recent sew along!). The shorts version of this pattern is lovely – chic and comfy like the pants, with plenty of hem length options and room for full leg movement, perfect for hikes, yardwork and dance battles, should the need arise. So much love for the flat front/elastic back waistband!Screen Shot 2018 06 12 at 1.35.03 PM Shorts Sewing Pattern Roundup: Our Top Picks

For something a bit more fitted and structured, give the Oceanside Shorts by Blank Slate Patterns a go. This pattern features an ingenious waist tie (that actually works and is comfy too!), a slight paperbag waist effect and cute fold-down pockets for slight safari vibes.

Screen Shot 2018 06 12 at 1.37.41 PM Shorts Sewing Pattern Roundup: Our Top Picks
Structured
Newsflash: shorts can be sophisticated, people!

If you’re into high waisted looks, give the Lander Shorts by True Bias a go! This design is fitted through the waist and hip, and the button fly and utility-style pockets are is a nice style point (though there’s an expansion pack option with a zipper fly!).

Screen Shot 2018 06 12 at 1.45.04 PM Shorts Sewing Pattern Roundup: Our Top Picks

For a straight-cut, chino style, you’ve got options, from the classy Alphi Chino Shorts by Named Clothing to the classic Chi-Town Chinos by Alina Sewing & Design. In the structured category, we’re also a big fan of the look-good-in-every fabric Maritime Shorts by Grainline Studio.

Sporty
Is yardwork a sport? Either way (please say yes!), shorts with a slightly sporty cut will serve you well this summer.

I love the Made with Moxie Prefontaine Shorts. Sew these up in woven or knit for a variety of looks, from super sporty to casual errands Saturday. And pockets. Pockets!

Screen Shot 2018 06 12 at 1.54.47 PM Shorts Sewing Pattern Roundup: Our Top Picks

For a truly sport option, as in for running, try the marathon-tested Threshold Shorts by Fehr Trade. These shorts come with many options built-in, including three pocket versions and running undies that can be attached to the shorts waistband for maximum comfort over long distances.

Screen Shot 2018 06 12 at 1.57.57 PM Shorts Sewing Pattern Roundup: Our Top Picks.

 Shorts Sewing Pattern Roundup: Our Top Picks
Posted in Garment Sewing | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Tony Award Fashions

I am a total theater geek and live for the Tony Awards. I love to see and hear what’s new on Broadway and while I watch the awards, I’m always inspired to travel to New York and have a weekend hopping from theater to theater along the Great White Way.

hiking Tony Award FashionsThis year, I’ve had the joy of watching Hamilton in Denver, and I’ll just say that it is totally worth the hype. If you get a chance to see it, do it–whether you think you like theater or not. It is a truly brilliant piece of art.

On my list for the rest of this year is Dear Evan Hansen (also in Denver), and in NYC: The Boys in The Band (what an all-star cast!) My Fair Lady (because I absolutely love Lauren Ambrose and her performance on the Tonys was amazing…who knew she could sing like that?) Continue reading

 Tony Award Fashions
Posted in Fashion, Sewing Inspiration | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 1: Pattern Prep, Fabric, and Front Band Assembly

Welcome to part one of our Cap Sleeve (Plus Size) Blouse Sew Along with Meg Healy from BurdaStyle.com!

This week we will introduce you to the blouse pattern and how you can “Sproutify” it to get your size’s pattern pieces directly printed on the fabric with custom print placement. Then Meg will cover the suitable fabrics, as well as the first sewing steps to create this lovely, waist-hugging blouse. Take it away Meg!
Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along MAIN Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 1: Pattern Prep, Fabric, and Front Band AssemblyThis pattern is a beautiful blouse for women who like to accentuate their waistline. The crossover bodice and tying bands define the midriff, while the extended shoulders and attached cap sleeves are wonderfully complementary and add visual balance to the pattern.

You can sew this blouse in Burda sizes 44-52, which corresponds to US sizes 14-22! Note: Since BurdaStyle is a European brand, although the sizing may correspond to US sizes 14-22 they run a little small due to the different ideals in Europe. So If you fit into the larger sizes of Burda’s standard chart, then you can certainly fit into the lower sizes of Burda’s plus size. Check out our size chart here with measurements.

Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along TECHNICAL Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 1: Pattern Prep, Fabric, and Front Band AssemblyYou have a couple options when it comes to sewing up this blouse pattern, you can either download the digital pattern here with video and pick up fabric – or (our favorite way) is to order through Sprout . Simply select your size using your bust circumference as the base measurement, choose your fabric, and then customize it by uploading your own prints or using the Spoonflower database. The wrap style and waist tie bands offer a fabulous fit to this blouse so you don’t need to worry about alterations and adjustments. With the purchase of a Sprout pattern you’ll also receive the digital PDF pattern so you can sew it again and again!

As a special for this sew along, Sprout is offering 15% off the Cap Sleeve (Plus Size) Blouse using code SEWCAPSLV – one discounted blouse per customer.

Order and customize yours and make a truly one-of-a-kind piece!

Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along SPROUT LAYOUT Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 1: Pattern Prep, Fabric, and Front Band AssemblyWhen ordering through Sprout you don’t need to worry about yardage, but you will need to make some decisions as far as fabric goes. This pattern’s recommended materials are: Softly draping fabrics, with or without elastane and the blouse in the magazine was constructed using a crepe with widthwise stretch. If sewing it just from the PDF pattern be sure to pick up 1 3/4 yds – 1 7/8 yds of woven fabric of your desired weight.

For a more structured blouse go with a cotton sateen or even a canvas, then if you want it more flow then opt for a silky faille or even crepe de chine. You’ll also need to pick up some interfacing to stabilize the facings and that’s it – no zippers, buttons, snaps, or anything!

For the Sprout option you have the following fabrics to choose from:
Basic Cotton Ultra
Kona Cotton Ultra
Cotton Popline Ultra
Poly Crepe de Chine
Organic Cotton Sateen Ultra
Silky Faille

Read more about the fabric options that can be created, it’s so much fun!

You can really have fun in the design tool selecting your prints and placements. My favorite way to customize this pattern is to use the co-ordinates option to get perfectly matching solids for my prints and use for the neck and tie bands.

Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along OPTIONS Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 1: Pattern Prep, Fabric, and Front Band Assembly

All these examples feature our signature BurdaStyle prints, see them all here . You could even make every single section a different print and it will all come on the same piece of fabric!

Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along SPROUT Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 1: Pattern Prep, Fabric, and Front Band Assembly

The pattern will come printed on one piece of fabric and all you need to do is cut out the pattern pieces, and I suggest to cut out the piece names and then pin them to the pieces so you don’t forget.

Note: If you are using just the pattern PDF, then you will need to add seam allowance to the pattern pieces.

Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along STEP 1 Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 1: Pattern Prep, Fabric, and Front Band Assembly

Step 1: Fuse interfacing to the wrong sides of the armhole facings. There will be four in total, two for each armhole.

Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along STEP 2 Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 1: Pattern Prep, Fabric, and Front Band Assembly

Step 2: Mark your darts. If using the Sprout version, refer to the table of contents for printing out the pattern page with the dart legs and mark onto your pieces. There are notches along the sides of the pieces, just not the dart legs. I used a frixion pen and ruler to mark these.

Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along STEP 3 Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 1: Pattern Prep, Fabric, and Front Band Assembly

Step 3: Sew the waist darts in the bodice pieces. Start from the waist seam, backstitch, and then knot the thread tail at the dart tip.Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along STEP 4 Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 1: Pattern Prep, Fabric, and Front Band Assembly

Step 4: Serge-finish both of the shoulder edges, and sew right sides together. Press open.Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along STEP 5 Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 1: Pattern Prep, Fabric, and Front Band Assembly

Step 5: Sew the shoulder seams of the neck band pieces, right sides together, and press open. Also press the lower allowance to the wrong side. Pin right sides to wrong sides of bodice around the wrapped neck edge matching up the shoulder seams.Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along STEP 6 Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 1: Pattern Prep, Fabric, and Front Band Assembly

Step 6: Pin all the way from waistline to waistline on each front. Stitch together.

Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along STEP 7 Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 1: Pattern Prep, Fabric, and Front Band Assembly

Step 7: Grade the neckband seam allowance to half its width.

Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along STEP 8 Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 1: Pattern Prep, Fabric, and Front Band Assembly

Step 8: Flip the neck bands to the right side having the seam exactly at the edge, and pin the pressed under allowance in place on the bodice.Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along STEP 9 Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 1: Pattern Prep, Fabric, and Front Band Assembly

Step 9: Press and pin all along the wrapped neckline.

Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along STEP 10 Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 1: Pattern Prep, Fabric, and Front Band AssemblyStep 10: Topstitch close to pressed edge.

If you want instructor help sewing together this blouse with an additional video tutorial, then you can register here!

Cap Sleeve Blouse Sew Along STEP 11 Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 1: Pattern Prep, Fabric, and Front Band Assembly

Tune in next week where I’ll be going over the next steps in making this blouse, and don’t forget to use code SEWCAPSLV for 15% off on Sprout (good until June 30th 2018). Get yours here!

See you next week!

IMG 2914 e1525804648822 150x150 Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 1: Pattern Prep, Fabric, and Front Band Assembly

 Cap Sleeve Plus Size Blouse Sew Along, Part 1: Pattern Prep, Fabric, and Front Band Assembly
Posted in Sew Along - BurdaStyle Cap Sleeve Blouse | Tagged , , | 1 Comment