Quick & Easy Halloween Costume Using Freezer Paper

It’s not too late to make a great costume! Freezer paper stencils, fabric paint and a little ingenuity are all you need to put together a quick and fun Halloween outfit.

Get Your Boo On Quick & Easy Halloween Costume Using Freezer PaperFreezer paper stencils are easy to make and can spice up a T-shirt easily. Use glow-in-the-dark paint to add a ghost to a shirt and you’ll be the smash of the party lights on or off. Create a stencil to mimic a super hero’s costume and you’re ready to step out as a caped crusader. All you need is a little stencil know-how.

Freezer Paper 101

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Freezer paper has two sides

Freezer paper has two sides, a shiny side coated with wax and a paper side. The shiny side will adhere to the fabric when heat is applied. Draw designs on the paper side; lettering won’t need to be reversed.

Adhere the freezer paper to a shirt or other fabric using a hot dry iron. Don’t run the iron across the freezer paper, press and hold for 10 seconds before moving on to another section. Be sure to press the edges of the stencil where the paint will be applied twice to ensure they set correctly.

To create a costume in a jiffy seek out fabric paint that dries in just a few hours. Check paint labels to confirm drying time and fabric prep.

Pumpkin T-Shirt Costume

 Supplies:

  • One T-shirt in your size
  • One T-shirt two (or more) sizes larger
  • Freezer paper
  • Fabric paint
  • Foam brush or bristled paint brush
  • Coordinating thread
  • Newspaper

Stencil Time

Cut a piece of freezer paper to span the width of the smaller shirt’s chest, place it shiny side down on your work surface.

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Draw a fun pumpkin face for your costume

Draw out a pumpkin face. Much like when carving a pumpkin, the portions of the freezer paper you remove will be black. Remember to draw your design planning for paint to appear wherever you draw openings. Cut out the stencil and place it on the larger shirt.

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Line up the stencil on your shirt

Measure the stencil’s upper edge and mark the center. Line this mark up with the center of the larger shirt’s collar. Place the stencil about halfway down the shirt.

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Press the stencil using high heat

Once the stencil is in place, heat the iron to high heat and turn off the steam function. I cut out my stencil with very little room on the lower edge. I added a layer of freezer paper to help keep the paint from getting on the shirt. Press the stencil onto the shirt by placing the iron down, holding it for 10 seconds and then picking the iron up and pressing it down again in a different spot. Don’t run the iron across the stencil as this may cause bubbles to form or the stencil to shift. Allow the fabric to cool.

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Paint your stencil

Place a piece of cardboard under the stencil, between the shirt front and back layers. This will keep the paint from bleeding through to the shirt’s back. Squeeze a bit of paint onto a paper plate. Carefully paint the stencil’s open areas. Don’t glob the paint on unless you want an uneven finish to your shirt. Bear in mind, the thicker the paint the longer it will take to dry. Allow the paint to dry completely.

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Admire your stencil’s work.

Carefully peel the freezer paper from the shirt. The stencil should keep the paint from bleeding through the edges. However, if this did occur, use a small paint brush and a wee bit of paint to smooth out any sloppy lines. Allow the new paint to dry.

Sew That Pumpkin

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Place the larger shirt inside the smaller shirt. The larger shirt’s right side should be touching the smaller shirt’s wrong side. Align the collar and shoulder seams. Smooth out the back of the larger shirt along the smaller shirt’s hem, pinning the two hems together as you go. By doing so, you will push all the excess fabric to the shirt’s front.

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Pin the pleats as though you’re making inverted pleats, once turned right side out the pleats will be box pleats

To fold the excess fabric into the smaller shirt’s hem, create two box pleats using the larger shirt’s excess fabric. Pin the pleats as though you’re making inverted pleats, once turned right side out a box pleat will form. Place the box pleats to either side of the stencil. Stitch along the shirt’s hem.

Shirts9 Quick & Easy Halloween Costume Using Freezer Paper

Turn the shirts right side out

Turn the shirts right side out, tucking the smaller shirt inside the larger shirt. Align the collars and shoulder seams.

Pin the two sleeve seams together and create a box pleat on the sleeve upper edge. Stitch around the sleeve’s lower edge. Repeat to finish the remaining sleeve.

Shirts10 Quick & Easy Halloween Costume Using Freezer Paper

Create box pleats on the sleeves as well

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Stuff with news paper or fiber fill

Stuff wadded up newspaper between the two shirts and into the sleeves. Stuff until the pumpkin reaches your ideal roundness. Wear this pumpkin shirt with black or green leggings for a fun night out trick-or-treating.

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A Quick and Easy Halloween Costume

Besides the time waiting for the paint to dry, this project should only require an hour to complete. So what are you waiting for? Grab some freezer paper and get to stitching!

Be sure to send your costume sewing project pictures to the Sew News Flickr group.  We’d love to see what you’re making this year!

Be sure to check out Sew News for more fun projects, tips and great contributors!

 

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Make a costume for the family pet + Download the FREE templates!

We have a fun blog post from contributor Jessie. We can’t let the humans have all the fun, whip up a super cute doggie costume for Halloween this year and see your treats double!

Be sure to check out all the Sew News freebies from current and past issues.

DogMain 1024x1024 Make a costume for the family pet + Download the FREE templates!

Make an easy dog costume!

Don’t leave your best friend out of the fun on Halloween night. Stitch up a quick and fun skeleton costume out of an old T-shirt and felt and send Fido out to haunt the night.

Supplies

  • 1 Black T-shirt {size determined by dog}
  • One 8 1/2”x11” piece of white craft felt
  • One 3/4” piece of 5/8” sew on hook-and-loop tape
  • Coordinating all-purpose thread
  • Temporary spray adhesive
  • Newspaper
  • Tailor’s chalk (optional)

Measure Your Mutt

To find a shirt that will fit your dog, measure the circumference of your dog’s neck and the length of his/her back. Compare the neck measurement to the collar of an old T-shirt. The ideal shirt will have a collar that fit’s the neck measurement and the shirt’s length will fall long enough to be trimmed to your dog’s back length. Don’t fret if you can’t find a shirt to meet these specifics, seek out a shirt that’s a little too large and sew it to size. For this skeleton costume a black shirt works best.

Try the shirt on your dog, pull the collar to fit your dog’s neck mark with chalk or very carefully with a pin.

Mark just before the hind legs of your dog to indicate where the shirt’s lower edge should fall. The shirt shouldn’t hinder the dog’s ability to walk, cutting it before the hind legs will keep your pup trotting happily.

Pull any excess fabric in the chest and body area together, mark.

Carefully remove the shirt from the dog.

Start Cutting

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Remove all extraneous shirt parts.

Begin by removing any unnecessary shirt parts such as long sleeves.

The shirt I found had a large image on the front that I didn’t want, so I cut it off. By doing so, I also created an open chest area that I completed with closure bones and was able to fit the shirt to my dog better. If the shirt you’re working with is plain black and isn’t too big for your dog, you may not need to cut the shirt front out. Though, it will be easier to sew the bones onto the shirt back should you elect to cut open the front.

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The blue pin shows where the collar fits my dog best, the pink pin is 1/2” away to allow for a 1/2” seam allowance.

Place the shirt on a work surface with the collar flattened. Measure 1/2” from the collar mark or pin, mark.

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Cut out the shirt’s front.

Cut along the mark 2” into the shirt’s body. Proceed to remove the excess shirt in the chest area, adding 1/2” seam allowance to the original marks.

If you would like to create an open chest with bone closures, remove up to 2 1/2” additional between the sleeve seams and 3 1/2” additional in the remaining T-shirt body.

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Cut the hem off to create a shorter shirt for your pooch

Lay the shirt flat on a work surface, measure across the shirt’s lower edge, making sure your original marks are an even line. Trim 1/4” from the original marks to allow the fabric to roll up. If you prefer to hem the lower edge, cut 1/2” from the original marks.

Bone Business

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Cut out bones from the craft felt.

Download the Dog Skeleton Template and print. Increase or decrease the template’s size to fit the size of your dog. Consider adding more ribs if your dog is larger, or even draw up a pelvis to add into the bone mix. Cut out all dog bones from the white felt.

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Take a picture of the bone lay out before proceeding to the next step

Lay the bones out on the T-shirt as indicated in the image above. Snap a quick picture to recall the layout. Spread newspaper over the work surface. Flip the bones over and place on the newspaper. Following the manufacturer’s instruction’s spray the bones with temporary spray adhesive. Return the bones to the shirt, referring to the photo for placement guidelines.

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Stitch the bones to the shirt.

Stitch the bones to the shirt using a straight stitch.

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Stitch the collar closed.

Using a 1/2” seam allowance, sew the collar right sides together. Press the seam open. If you prefer to not create a bone closure, sew down the shirt front’s length.

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Pin the hook-and-loop tape to the closure bones.

Pin the hook-and-loop tape to the closure bones’ straight edges. The smaller bone will close the space between the sleeve seams and the larger bone will close the chest. Stitch the hook-and-loop tape to the bones.

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Stitch the bone closures to the shirt to complete this costume

Pin the smaller bone to the sleeve seams, allowing for 1/2” overlap of T-shirt fabric and felt. Stitch the bone to the shirt using a straight stitch. Proceed to stitch the opposite bone, aligning the hook-and-loop tape to ensure that the pieces will meet up nicely. Attach the second bone closure 2” below the first.

Hem the T-shirt lower edge if you want, though the knit won’t unravel and should roll up just a bit.

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Bedeck your dog in this skeleton costume for a barkingly good time!

Upload pictures of your pooch all dressed up for Halloween to the Sew News Reader Flickr group. We’d love to see what you’re stitching!

 

 

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Final week of the Emily Bag Sew Along

It has been a lot of fun working on the ithinksew Emily Bag. We hope you were able to make the bag at home or bookmark the Sew News Blog for future reference. Let’s have Rhonda get started on the final week of the Emily Bag!

emily bag 6001 Final week of the Emily Bag Sew Along I hope your bags are coming along nicely. We are now in the final stretch, just a few customizing details to add and our bags will be finished.

Last week’s video covered attaching the magnetic snap, so this week, I will just briefly go over it once again.

There is a marking on the pattern for the magnetic snap. Transfer the marking to the lining of the bag.

With the first bag that I made, I used a fusible cotton interfacing. To give a little extra security to the snap, I added an extra small square of interfacing just behind the snap.

photo 38 Final week of the Emily Bag Sew AlongI used a fusible fleece to interface the bag that I made for the sew along. Since the fleece has more body, I did not add a piece of interfacing to reinforce the back of the snap.

Make 2 small snips on either side of the center of the magnetic snap backing. Once the 2 small snips have been made, simply push the prongs of the snap through, place the snap backing over the prongs and push the prongs out.

photo 39 Final week of the Emily Bag Sew AlongDo the same to the other side of the bag and your magnetic snap will be securely in place.

photo 40 Final week of the Emily Bag Sew AlongOnce the handles have been sewn together, place them in the center of the strap area and baste in place. Match the lining to the bag with right sides together and stitch around the top of the bag. If by chance you did not leave an opening in the lining to turn the bag, just open 1 of the seams of the lining enough to turn.

photo 411 Final week of the Emily Bag Sew AlongBe sure to clip the seam around the top of the bag. You’ll notice that the seam is curved. So if the seam is clipped, the seam will lay flatter once it is pressed. You will also need to clip the corners by the handles.

Once the lining has been turned to the inside of the bag, simply stitch the opening closed. I stitched mine closed by hand as the fusible fleece is a little bulky, but if you used a cotton interfacing, you can stitch the opening closed on the machine.

photo 42 Final week of the Emily Bag Sew AlongTo give the bag a little more structure, I made a hard bottom using chip board. Chip board can be found at an art supply store. It comes in large sheets and it is perfect for creating a hard bottom to a bag. It comes in 2 weights. Buy the heavier weight. Even with the heavier weight, I used 2 pieces of the board.

To cut the board, you will need to use an exacto knife or a sharp razor blade. Be careful of your fingers!!! Use the pattern that you made for the bottom of the bag, but remember to trim off the seam allowances.

photo 43 Final week of the Emily Bag Sew AlongOnce the boards have been cut, cut a piece of fabric that is long enough to go around the boards and wide enough to have a seam allowance on either end. Sew a seam down the middle of the fabric making a pocket that the boards will slide into. Sew one end of the pocket and turn to the right side.

photo 44 Final week of the Emily Bag Sew AlongPush the boards into the pocket. Turn the other end of the pocket in against the board and hand stitch it closed.

photo 45 Final week of the Emily Bag Sew AlongBag feet make a lovely addition to this bag and give it a high end look. Bag feet are available at your local fabric store.

Using my clear ruler, I measured in 1″ from both sides of the bottom of my bag. Place a mark at this point and then punch a hole with your seam ripper or your scissors. Push the prongs of the foot through the hole. Do this on all 4 corners of the bag.

photo 46 Final week of the Emily Bag Sew AlongThe feet prongs are pushed through the outside of the bag as well as the lining. Remember, we have made a removable hard bottom that will cover the prongs on the inside of the bag.Just like the magnetic snap, the bag feet have a backing piece. Lay the backing over the prongs and then push the prongs to either side.

photo 47 Final week of the Emily Bag Sew AlongThe feet are in place.

photo 48  Final week of the Emily Bag Sew Along

The finished bag. Ready for a day of shopping!!!

photo 49 Final week of the Emily Bag Sew Along Check out the video below. Click on the image to view.

Screen Shot 2014 10 27 at 10.07.26 AM Final week of the Emily Bag Sew AlongI hope you have enjoyed the sew along and I hope you have found a new favorite bag pattern. Be sure to check out the other patterns that are available on the IThinkSew website. There are a number of wonderful bag patterns and they also have lots of other fun easy patterns that I think you’ll enjoy. They have sales from time to time, so you might want to sign up for their email alerts.

Once you’ve finished your bag, be sure to upload a picture to the Emily Bag Flickr page. I would love to see your creations. I would also like to showcase your designs on my blog in an upcoming post, so get busy!!!

Our next sew along is going to be coming up shortly and I know you are going to enjoy it. Just to tempt you a bit, it’s a coat!!! So watch the Sew News blog for more info soon!

Until then,

Sew On!!!

Rhonda Buss

www.rhondabuss.blogspot.com

 

 

 

 

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Make A Duct Tape Dummy

Have you always wanted to make a duct tape dress form? Duct tape dress forms in my opinion are far superior to store bought. A duct tape dummy will be a near exact copy of your body and dimensions. It’s great tool for fitting garments and it’s much cheaper than store bought. With instructor Tish Gance and Craftdaily.com you can now make your own beautiful duct tape dummy.

I’ve always wanted to do this but was a little intimidated by it all. But, Tish will walk you through the entire process, and you can’t help but feel more confident about doing it yourself, especially with the video. You can always start and stop at any time, go back to catch a detail you missed.

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It should go without saying, but you will need a sewing buddy to do this and just a few basic supplies + lots of duct tape. Tish has been making these for herself and for clients for several years and knows all the ins and outs of what makes a successful ‘dummy’.

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Watch a preview for How to Make Your Own Duct Tape Dummy and you get a sample of what you will learn in this video class. The Make Your Own Duct Tape Dummy class is just over an hour and shows you all that you will need in ways of supplies, tips on how to get a perfect duct tape dummy and expert guidance from Tish Gance who just so happens to know a thing or two about duct tape and dummies.

I would love to know if you take this class what you thought of seeing yourself in duct tape and how it turned out!

Screen Shot 2014 10 10 at 11.51.33 AM Make A Duct Tape Dummy

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Find easy to sew, low-sew Halloween costume ideas!

Read on from guest blogger Jessica G on ideas for easy Halloween costumes.

Pattern Power! Pick out a costume pattern and go for it!

Halloween is lurking just around the corner. Show off your sewing skills by stitching up a quick costume. You may think there’s not enough time to finish a costume, but you have several factors in your corner. Use the following tips and inspiration to stitch up a Halloween costume pattern post haste!

Many Halloween costume patterns are designed to be completed quickly. The pattern drafter creates patterns with fewer pieces to shorten sewing time. Don’t be afraid to pull out the pattern instruction sheet and check how many pieces are involved in the pattern.

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This pattern has 18 pieces but only 9 are needed for the main costume, add in accessories such as a cape or eye mask if time allows

In addition to fewer pieces, many patterns have simple closures such as a single zipper, a drawstring waist or a minimal number of buttonholes. Scope out the pattern envelope back to see what notions are needed, you may be surprised at how few are necessary.

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This pattern only requires a zipper.

Watch for patterns that say “Easy” or “One Hour” these can be stitched up in a hurry.

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These patterns declare how simple they are to sew

Avoid patterns that are historically accurate. Unless you’re planning to dress up as a Greek goddess in a toga or a cave woman in scraps of faux fur, historical costumes often require more time and attention to detail. Don’t limit your scope to just the Halloween costume options, take a gander at the non-costume patterns that are easier to sew.

Many costumes are all about accessories, create a red cape with a hood and in no time at all, you’re Red Riding Hood.

Photo4 e1413913972463 768x1024 Find easy to sew, low sew Halloween costume ideas!

This cape pattern is easy to sew and versatile as a costume.

Sew the hooded cape up in black and pair with a white mask and you’re the Phantom of the Opera. If you’re sewing for a little one, create fun and easy accessories to be paired with leotards and you’ll have a costumed side kick in no time.

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Capes, masks and belts can make a quick and fun costume for a wee
one

Once you’ve selected your pattern, scope out the recommended fabrics on the envelope back. Look for patterns made out of fabrics you’re comfortable sewing. Additionally, if a pattern calls for fleece, knits or felt, you won’t need to finish the seams. Fleece and felt will also keep you warm should you happen to live in a cooler climate.

Get inspired!

Use these fun patterns to stitch up a costume in no time!

The “Classic Cloak” from Sew it All vol. 2 would work nicely as a costume.

cloak full 682x1024 Find easy to sew, low sew Halloween costume ideas!Stitch up the cloak in Dalmatian spots, don a pair of long red gloves and a black and white wig and step out as Cruella De Ville. Cloaks are incredibly versatile, and this one is short and flirty. If Cruella isn’t your style, make it in black, pop some fangs in your mouth, wear a mysterious amulet on a red ribbon and haunt the night as Countess Dracula.

 Serge a “Darling Dress” from season 6 of Sew it All TV  for a  fun feminine costume.

DarlingDressfull size 596x1024 Find easy to sew, low sew Halloween costume ideas! Add a bit of fringe to the hem and wear it out with a flashy headband and you’re ready to hit the town as a Flapper. If the “Darling Dress” doesn’t strike your fancy make a fun and flirty knit dress from Craft Daily.   The neckline on this dress feels Greek, consider stitching this dress up in white, donning a gilded laurel headband and heading out the door as a Greek Goddess.

 If you have a little more time, consider sewing the Robson Coat pattern from shopsewitall.com. 1501 Sewaholic Robson 636x1024 Find easy to sew, low sew Halloween costume ideas! A trench coat is a great option for a costume, not only will it keep you warm but once Halloween night has been thoroughly haunted you’re left with a practical coat. Sew the coat in grey, pull on a pair of brown gloves and wear a grey fedora to go as Inspector Gadget. If you want to get really fancy, purchase a grabber and put a yellow glove on the end to poke out your sleeve as a gadget. Alternatively, this trench stitched up in khaki accompanied by a microphone prop and a hat with a press pass in it would make a great intrepid reporter costume.

Show us what you stitch up as a costume! Upload your costume picks to the Sew News Reader Flickr group! Have a Happy Halloween!

 

 

 

 

 

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Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & Construction

I think the Emily Bag is going to be in my top 5 tote bag sewing patterns. I'm a little behind in the sewing of it, (as usual) but I'll catch up. Hope everyone is enjoying the process. For more fantastic bag patterns and videos be sure to check out Craft Daily, with over 500 sewing and craft videos there a something for everyone. Let's have Rhonda get us going on week 3!!!

emily bag 6001 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & ConstructionNow that we’ve downloaded your pattern, chosen your fabrics and gathered all of your supplies, we can finally get started on putting the bag together!!

You will find that the bag is extremely easy to sew. The zippered pocket may seem a little intimidating, but I encourage you to give it a try. Just follow my instructions and be sure to try the zipper out on some scrap fabric before inserting it into your bag.

Once you have cut out all of your pieces and interfaced your lining, decide where you would like to place your zippered pocket. There is a marking on the pattern, but just consider this a guideline, as you can move it up or down just a bit depending on the length of your zipper. If you weren’t able to purchase a 5″ zipper, you will need to move the pocket down just a little so that the zipper doesn’t interfere with the seams of the side panels. One more thing to keep in mind is the magnetic clasp. You will need enough room between the top of the bag and the zipper to insert the clasp.

photo 211 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & Construction Once you have determined where to place the zipper, draw in a rectangle. The rectangle should be the length of your zipper and 1/2″ wide.

photo 22 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & Construction Stitch along the outside lines of the rectangle.

photo 23 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & Construction Now this is very important. Cut the rectangle open. Make sure that you cut in the middle and leave AT LEAST a 1/2″ “v” tab on either end.

photo 24 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & ConstructionMatch the edge of the zipper to the edge of the slit opening and be sure that the teeth of the zipper are in the middle of the opening of the slit. Sew the zipper to the bag, stitching along the guideline that was previously stitched in. Sew from one end of the rectangle to the other. Do not sew across the ends at this time. As you sew along, you will need to unzip the zipper in order to move the head of the zipper out of the way of your pressure foot. Be sure to use a zipper foot to sew your zipper into your bag.

photo 25 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & Construction Once both sides of the zipper have been sewn in, determine how deep you would like your pocket to be. 5″ is a nice depth. Cut a rectangle that is at least an inch longer than your zipper and twice the desired depth.

Match the right side of the fabric to the zipper and sew the pocket to the zipper.

photo 26 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & Construction Sew the other end of the pocket lining to the other side of the zipper. The inside of the pocket will have a beautifully finished look.

photo 27 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & Construction To finish the pocket, pull the “v” tabs out and lay them flat against the end of the zipper. Sew the seam. Be sure to sew exactly across the stitches on the tab. Once sewn, sew across the ends one last time to reinforce the ends of the zipper.

photo 28 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & Construction

photo 29 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & Construction  Congratulations! You now have a beautifully inserted zippered pocket.

If you would like, you may add a patch pocket to the other side of your bag. This is a very handy pocket, especially for cell phones.

Simply cut a rectangle the desired width that you would like your pocket to be. The length of the rectangle should be twice the desired length of your finished pocket. Place the right sides together and sew around the edges, leaving a small opening. Trim the seam if necessary, turn the pocket and press. Stitch along the end of the pocket with a double stitching line. This will keep the top edge of your pocket from stretching. Determine where the placement of the pocket and pin in place.

photo 30 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & Construction Edge stitch the pocket to the lining and then stitch a second row to reinforce the pocket.

photo 311 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & ConstructionOnce the pockets are in place, sew the side panels of the bag to the center panels. Seam allowances are 1/2″. Do not sew to the end of the panels. Leave 1/2″ open at the bottom of the bag. This will allow you to easily attach the bottom of the bag to the body of the bag.

photo 32 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & ConstructionSew the bottom of the bag to the body, sewing from point to point.

photo 33 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & ConstructionDo the same with the lining. Clip the intersection of the seams. This will remove all the bulk out of the corners.

photo 34 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & ConstructionThe outer bag has a lovely pleat at center front. The lining does not have the pleat. Pin pleat in place,

photo 35 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & Construction

and stitch in place to secure while putting the bag together.

photo 36 Emily Bag Sew Along Week 3: Customizing & ConstructionFollow the instructions in the video for stitching the handles. Baste handles to the bag.

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Click on image to view Rhonda’s tutorial

Next week we will attach the magnetic closure and sew in the lining. Once the lining has been sewn in, we will add the feet and construct the hard bottom.

Be sure to visit the Flickr page and post your progress. I can’t wait to see how you’re doing!!

Rhonda Buss

Rhonda’s Creative Life

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Week 2: Emily Bag Sew Along – Fabric Choice & Supplies

Have you joined the Emily Bag Sew-Along? It’s such a great bag! It’s roomy and stylish and can fit just about anyone’s needs. This is our first e-pattern sew along so far. If you need any help in how to print out e-patterns please check out this tutorial on successful printing out of any e-pattern. Be sure to check out all the free bag patterns at Sew It All magazine for more inspiration. And, here’s Rhonda get started!

emily bag 600 Week 2: Emily Bag Sew Along   Fabric Choice & Supplies

Hopefully you have had a chance to download your Emily Bag Pattern from I Think Sew Patterns. As far as downloadable patterns goes, this is one of the easiest to download, so please don’t be intimidated.

Once you have downloaded the pattern, it’s time to think about your fabric choices. This pattern is very versatile. You can use quilting cottons, home dec fabrics, even faux and real leather.

I used a home dec weight fabric for the exterior of my first bag and a faux leather for the interior. The faux leather was also used for the bottom of the bag as well as the handles. Since both of the fabrics had quite a bit of weight to them and were quite stable, I did not interface the bag.

photo 131 Week 2: Emily Bag Sew Along   Fabric Choice & SuppliesThe second bag was made with the same home dec weight fabric for the exterior, but I used a quilting weight cotton for the interior. The interior fabric was interfaced with a fusible woven cotton interfacing.photo 141 Week 2: Emily Bag Sew Along   Fabric Choice & SuppliesFor the sew along, I wanted to give an idea I had a try. I’ve used fusible fleece in other projects and thought that I might like it in this project as well, and I was right!

Fusible fleece can be found at your local fabric store and it is made by Pellon. It does come in various weights. For this project I used a thin weight.

photo 151 Week 2: Emily Bag Sew Along   Fabric Choice & Supplies

The fusible fleece was used only on the interior fabric of the bag. The result was fabulous. Pictured below is the lining of my bag. It has enough body to stand on its own.

photo 161 Week 2: Emily Bag Sew Along   Fabric Choice & Supplies

The finished bag. For this bag, I used leather for the handles and the bottom of my bag.

photo 17 Week 2: Emily Bag Sew Along   Fabric Choice & Supplies

Something to keep in mind when choosing your fabrics. I had initially wanted to make a bag out of the patterned fabric pictured below. Once I began to cut the fabric, I realized that I did not have enough. I had enough yardage, but due to the pattern placement on the fabric, I would need twice the amount of fabric.

photo 18 Week 2: Emily Bag Sew Along   Fabric Choice & SuppliesAs I discussed last week, I made a hard bottom for my bag. I used chip board which can be found at an art supply store. Chip board comes in 2 weights, be sure to purchase the thicker board.

If you would like to add feet to your bag, they can be purchased at your local fabric store along with a magnetic closure. Touches like adding feet and including a magnetic closure will give your bag that high end look that we all love.

photo 19 Week 2: Emily Bag Sew Along   Fabric Choice & Supplies

Rhonda’s You-Tube Video

http://youtu.be/ijeb8-fOuP4

 

Next week we will begin sewing our bag together and we will also sew in the zippered pocket. Purchase a zipper that is no more than 7″ long. A 5″ zippered is ideal. A zipper with heavy metal teeth will also look wonderful inside your bag. A contrasting zipper might be fun too!

photo 20 Week 2: Emily Bag Sew Along   Fabric Choice & SuppliesSo, for this project, you will need;

  • FABRIC
  • 44″ wide heavyweight home decorator OR quilting weight cotton
    (1) Yard for exterior fabric
    (1) Yard for lining
  • - INTERFACING
    (2) Yards of 22″ wide medium weight fusible interfacing, or  (1) yard of fusible fleece
    - OTHERS
    (1) 18mm Magnetic Snap
    (1) Spool of coordinating thread
  • (1) 5″, 6″ or 7″ zipper
  • (4) purse feet
  • (1) heavy weight chip board
  • Matching Thread

Be sure to visit the Flickr page for the Emily Bag Sew Along and post your fabric choices. I think it’s especially fun to see the fabric choices prior to seeing the final project.

Once you make 1 of these bags, you will be making more. The first 2 that I made have been spoken for and I have a feeling that I won’t be keeping my third either!!! Everyone seems to love these bags. Isn’t it fun when we find a bag pattern that’s easy to make and looks great too?!!

Rhonda Buss

Rhonda’s Creative Life

 

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Craft Daily – Watch FREE this weekend – Learn how to make a knit dress

Love to sew, craft, knit or bead? Are you ready to learn more techniques and expand your knowledge? Please check out the latest risk-free offer from Craft Daily. We’re celebrating our 500th video and want you to get a chance to view amazing videos from top instructors around the country all for a risk-free trial.

IW CraftDailyFreeTrial 450x300 Craft Daily   Watch FREE this weekend   Learn how to make a knit dressVisit CraftDaily.com where you can have risk-free access to 500 videos on all kinds of sewing, quilting, mixed-media, and crafting techniques, now through October 13, 2014. Just enter the code CDFT500 after selecting the risk-free trial for your cart at checkout. Note: This is a Risk Free Trial.  Sign up now, then immediately log in and uncheck the ‘auto-bill option.’ You won’t be charged for anything and you’ll enjoy your full period of free access.

Screen Shot 2014 10 10 at 12.27.05 PM Craft Daily   Watch FREE this weekend   Learn how to make a knit dress

Watch a preview for how to Use a Serger to Make a Quick & Easy Knit Dress and you’ll get a sample of what you will learn in a video class. The Use a Serger to Make a Quick & Easy Knit Dress is just over an hour and shows you all that you will need in ways of supplies, tips expert guidance from June Mellingern on serging with knits. Plus a bonus project with Ellen March of Sew It All TV who will show you how easy it is to sew up a cute knit dress.

This risk-free trail offer at Craftdaily.com is available now through October 13. Your 5 days will begin as soon as you sign up any time between now and October 13.

Screen Shot 2014 10 10 at 11.51.33 AM Craft Daily   Watch FREE this weekend   Learn how to make a knit dress

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Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial – From Shannon Fabrics

Lisa Felthous Photography WC46 1024x731 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

This free tutorial written by Whimsy Couture .

These scarves feature Cuddle™ prints from Shannon Fabrics. For this neck warmer I used these prints:

Lead photo  Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabricsphoto 71 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon FabricsList of required materials:

  • Cuddle fabric
  • Satin fabric
  • Sewing machine
  • Scissors
  • Straight pins
  • Cutting mat
  • Rotary cutter
  • Vacuum or lint roller (sticky brush)
  • Basic sewing supplies, as needed

 

Seam allowance: 3/8” unless stated otherwise

Tip: when working with Cuddle fabric and Satin fabric you want to use LOTS of pins. Pin every inch for best results!

Sizing chart:

Cut the following measurements:

Age:

Cut 2x Cuddle fabric

Width x Length

Cut 2x Satin fabric

Width x Length

Teens

5”x17”

9.5×30”

Adults

6”x19”

11.5”x33”

These are the pieces you have cut out:

photo 31 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon FabricsTo make the satin ties, fold one of the satin pieces with right sides together, in half lengthwise:

photo 41 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

Pin along both long edges and one short side. Then sew in place using a short straight stitch (stitch length at 1.5-1.8 and tension at medium or 2-3). Backstitch the beginning and end:

photo 52 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

Repeat with second satin piece. Turn satin pieces with right sides out. This is what one piece will look like now:

photo 62 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

To sew the satin ties to the Cuddle fabric pieces:

Place one of the Cuddle fabric pieces with right side up in front of you and place one of the sewn satin ties onto the Cuddle fabric, aligning the open end with one of the Cuddle fabric piece sides:

photo 71 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon FabricsPlace second Cuddle fabric piece with right side down on top of the satin fabric. Pin in place and sew along the dashed lines as shown, leaving the other short side open. Make sure not to sew over the satin fabric inside the Cuddle fabric.

photo 81 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

Better view of the sewn piece with the satin tie reaching out:

photo 91 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

Clip corners off diagonally. Push the satin fabric all the way into the Cuddle fabric sleeve:

photo 101 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

Take your second satin fabric piece and insert it into the Cuddle fabric sleeve with the sewn short side first. At this time make sure that the seam of the satin ties face the same direction:

photo 111 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

Once fully inserted, align the open side of the satin fabric piece with the opening of the Cuddle fabric piece as shown:

photo 121 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

Pin the satin and Cuddle fabric together and leave a 3” opening as shown. Sew in place along the dashed lines. Backstitch the beginning and end by the opening:

photo 13 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

Carefully pull all fabrics through the opening so you will have the right sides shown.

 

To close the opening: photo 14 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

Fold both edges in and finger press the opening in place:

photo 15 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

With your machine close the opening along the dashed lines. Backstitch the beginning and end:

photo 16 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

All done!

You can find Shannon Fabrics Cuddle at your local fabric store or quilt shop. Here are a few stores across the country that carry a wide selection: Fabric Depot, Beverly’s Fabrics, and Mary Jo’s Cloth Store. You can also find Cuddle through many other online retailers.

Find Shannon Fabrics here:

Find Whimsy Couture ™ here:

 

photo 21 Cuddle Satin Neck Wrap Tutorial   From Shannon Fabrics

 

 

 

 

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Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today!

At Sew News we love bags. We love making them, using them and giving them as gifts. Generally they’re so easy to make and can be easily interpreted for different lifestyles, body shapes and personal needs. On the Sew News and Sew It All website we have a great assortment of bag patterns and projects. And, don’t forget to visit Craftdaily.com for even further instruction on making bags of all sorts and sizes.

emily bag 600 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! Today, we have a Rhonda Buss from Rhonda’s Creative Life starting our sew along for the Emily Bag from iThinksew. Today Rhonda will walk us through the pattern and discuss e-Patterns. At the end of today’s post there will be a short video as well as a link to a tutorial for printing out e-patterns. Enjoy! And don’t forget to post on Flickr as we sew-along.

The Emily Bag is one that everyone can use in their wardrobe. Perfect for the mom on the go, the student as well as anyone who needs a stylish bag to carry their things in to and from work.

 

The bag lends itself to lots of fabric combinations. It can be made with home dec fabrics, lined with cottons or as in the example, a faux leather.

photo 1 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! photo 2 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! During the sew along, I will show you how to insert a zippered pocket. photo 3 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! We will also attach a patch pocket, perfect for quick and easy access of your cell phone. photo 4 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! We will add feet to the bottom,

photo 5 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! and I will show you how to add a removable hard bottom.

photo 6 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! The Emily bag pattern is a PDF pattern, which means you will need to download the pattern and print it at home or the copy shop. I call this instant gratification, because as soon as I pay for the pattern, I am able to instantly print it and start working on it immediately!

If you have never used a PDF pattern, this is a great one to start with as there are only 6 sheets of paper to the pattern. A few things to keep in mind when printing your pattern. Be sure that your printer is set to not scale the pattern. Choose the “actual size” option.

Once you have printed the pattern, simply tape the pieces together. Each pattern piece for this pattern has only one taped seam. Please pay close attention to the pattern pieces as you may tape over some of the instructions as I did in the example below. If you look closely, you’ll see that I taped over the instructions to cut 2 lining pieces. When I cut my first bag, I spent a good deal of time trying to figure out what I had done wrong with the lining until I discovered that I had not cut out 2 pieces!photo 7 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! For this pattern, you will need to draft out 2 pattern pieces. This is VERY simple to do as both pieces are just rectangles.

For the purse bottom, draw out a rectangle that measures 13″ wide, by 7″ tall.photo 8 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! The instructions state to cut the handle 4″ wide by 10″ long. I found the length of the handle to be a little short for my comfort of wearing the bag on my shoulder. So when I made the second bag, I lengthened the handle to 12″ long. This worked out quite well.photo 8 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! photo 9 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! When I print out the instructions sheets for a pattern, I like to put them into book form. It helps to keep all the sheets together and I can easily flip through the pages as I work. Simply stack the pages and then staple along the edge. To save a little on my ink, or printing costs, I always print the instructions out in black and white.

photo 10 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! I think you will especially enjoy this pattern. I have decided to make 2 during the sew along, one as a tote for my groceries out of these fun vegetable prints,

photo 11 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! and the other out of a faux leather and this great print.

photo 12 Sew the Emily Bag form iThinksew. Join the first week of the sew along today! So download the pattern and get your materials ready. This is a bag that you will enjoy and it will make fabulous Christmas presents. I can’t imagine anyone not wanting one of these bags!!

http://youtu.be/En8ZqhgCLXE

Here is a tutorial on printing e-Patterns from the Sew News blog.

Be sure to check out the Emily Bag Sew Along Flickr group and post your fabric choices as well as your progress. I can’t wait to see your fabric combinations! I think this is going to be an especially fun sew along!!

Rhonda Buss

www.rhondabuss.blogspot.com

 

 

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