Moiré Monday

Moiré is a fabric that has a wavy or watery appearance.

moire1 Moiré Monday

Originally this watery effect was created during the weaving process, however, today it is done using a process called calendering. Calendering is essentially ironing. A piece of fabric is folded in half lengthwise with right sides together. Pressure and heated ribbed rollers are then used to create the watery effect. The greater the heat and the higher the pressure, the more luster the fabric will have.

Moiré is most commonly created of silk, but other fibers like cotton and rayon can also be used.

Moiré can be used for garments, linings, handbags and home décor projects such as window treatments and bedspreads.

Downsides to moiré:

Seams tend to pucker

Some of the watery designs are not permanent and can be removed by washing

Moiré frays easily and requires a nap layout

Tips for sewing with moiré

Since it is a fairly delicate fabric, consider adding a lining when making a garment to add durability.

If your moiré has wide ribs, remember to match them up when piecing together a pattern.

Use a straight stitch, 2mm to 2.5mm in length, and keep the fabric taut when stitching.

Always test press a fabric scrap first when ironing, even the steam can ruin the watery pattern.

Use sew-in interfacing when making garments since irons can damage the fabric.

A couple patterns to make with moiré. Both patterns call for silk, but would look beautiful with moiré.

Christmas stockings

Scarf

Have you ever used moiré? What did you make?

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3 Responses to Moiré Monday

  1. Sue Haver says:

    Yes, I h ghave sewn moire’ fabric. I used it to line vests I made for my daughters. I also used it to make toppers for windows…very pretty.

  2. Sunny says:

    Great learning about different fabrics. Would you use the roller foot when sewing?

  3. Ashley says:

    Hi Sunny: Yes you could use a roller foot. It would help to hold the fabric in place while sewing, since it can be a little slippery.

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