National Serger Month

featured hero2 300x205 National Serger Month

It’s the first ever National Serger Month! It’s about time we have an entire month dedicated to serging. So many people don’t know what to do with a serger–aside from finishing seams. I’m constantly asked “Why do I need such a thing?” Well, a serger provides a professional finish to garments that’s unattainable with a conventional machine. Plus, it helps you sew FASTER, which is always a plus for me.

The first time I used a serger, it was a small, clunky plastic model that I bought for under $50. It looked like a child’s play toy. But it did the job–finished seams of the garments I sold at festivals and online. I never changed the white thread, unless it ran out (when it was replaced with more white thread) and always had it next to my sewing machine. It enabled me to streamline my sewing and make more garments in less time. Granted, it was loud and the faster you used it, the wobblier it got. But for a starving college student, it worked.

When I started working at Sew News, I tried my first-ever “fancy” serger. It threaded itself! I could change the thread colors in no time, without using a pair of tweezers, and I learned all about decorative applications and feet and attachments. The first time I made a pair of knit pants using a serger, I was in love. Then I tried serging fleece. Effortless!

When I was invited to appear on an episode of Fons and Porter’s Love of Quilting, I decided to do an entire episode using a serger. The episode will air in the fall, but I’m leaving on Wednesday to tape my episode. I can’t give too much away, but I’ll just tell you that my project requires no hand sewing, no switching machines, and can be completed in a few hours–all because of the serger!

I still have that little clunky plastic machine, but it hasn’t left the shelf in my sewing room in over 8 years. Perhaps it’s time to donate…

I encourage all of you to get the most out of your serger this month. Try new techniques, new embellishments, experiment with two, three, four, five or more threads and see just what your model is capable of. Visit your local sewing machine dealer to test drive new models on the market and fall in love with the serger all over again.

Visit this blog every Monday during the month of April for more serger fun facts, free project links and more.

We’re excited to share in this effort of dispelling common misconceptions and fears associated with sergers, along with Baby Lock, who brought the first home sergers to the U.S. market over 40 years ago. Visit their National Serger Month site for even more information and enter for a chance to win a state-of-the-art serger!

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3 Responses to National Serger Month

  1. Karen Poole says:

    Is this the spot to enter the baby ock contest! The article saod enter below! I LOVE the Serger!! I love to use it on pretty much every thing. I have many Serger books that have projects and tips! I have made all of my Christmas gifts one year entirely on tje Serger!
    With my first Serger, I was A closet serger, then I saw a sewing With Nancy show and she was showing all the thongs you could do with it!! My tip to those considering buying a serger would be to buy the highest end Serger you can afford, Babyloch had the most user friendly serger, many with self threading as well as threading in no particular oder!

  2. Vicki says:

    I am also hoping that this is the proper place to enter the contest. I bought a cheaper serger and always have trouble threading it. A Baby lock is my dream serger! **fingers crossed**

  3. I needed to thank you for this very good
    read!! I absolutely loved every bit of it. I have you bookmarked to check out new stuff you post…

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