And the Winner of the Hand Dyed Giveaway Is…

Rose Marie!

Congratulations, Rose Marie! We’ll be in touch soon so we can get your prize in the mail to you.

HandDyed34281J 912x1024 And the Winner of the Hand Dyed Giveaway Is...

If you didn’t win this time but are still interested in the book, you can find Hand Dyed at abramsbooks.com.

Look for our next book giveaway on Nov. 7, 2019!

 And the Winner of the Hand Dyed Giveaway Is...
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Giveaway: Hand Dyed by Anna Joyce

It’s giveaway time!

We’re giving away a copy of Hand Dyed by Anna Joyce, as seen in the Aug./Sept. 2019 issue of Sew News:

HandDyed34281J 267x300 Giveaway: Hand Dyed by Anna JoyceHand Dyed: A Modern Guide to Dyeing in Brilliant Color for You and Your Home is a modern introduction to indigo and fiber-reactive dye that every crafter should have. Exploring traditional techniques like shibori and using organic compounds, this comprehensive how-to guide offers everything you need to know to create stylish, richly colored and patterned pieces and beautiful projects.

For your chance to win a copy of Hand Dyedleave a comment on this post between now and Tuesday, September 10, at noon Mountain Daylight Time. We’ll randomly pick a winner from among the commenters using Random.org.

Good luck!

 Giveaway: Hand Dyed by Anna Joyce
Posted in Book Giveaways | Tagged , , , | 6 Comments

And the winner of the Lunch Hour Wool Minis Giveaway is…

Moni!

Congratulations, Mini! We’ll be in touch soon so we can get your prize in the mail to you.

Wool minis 1015x1024 And the winner of the Lunch Hour Wool Minis Giveaway is...

If you didn’t win this time but are still interested in the book, you can find Lunch Hour Wool Minis at shopmartingale.com.

Look for our next book giveaway on September 5!

 And the winner of the Lunch Hour Wool Minis Giveaway is...
Posted in Book Giveaways | Tagged | 2 Comments

Giveaway: Lunch Hour Wool Minis by Kathy Brown

It’s giveaway time!

Wool minis 297x300 Giveaway: Lunch Hour Wool Minis by Kathy BrownWe’re giving away a copy of Lunch Hour Wool Minis by Kathy Brown, as seen in the June/July 2019 issue of Sew News:

So small, so sweet — so simple to complete! All that’s needed is a needle, thread, wool and a little time to make 14 cute and creative projects. Even beginners can easily appliqué these charming seasonal and everyday décor pieces and complete each in a few lunch hours or less.

For your chance to win a copy of Lunch Hour Wool Minis, leave a comment on this post between now and midnight on Monday, August 5. We’ll randomly pick a winner from among the commenters using Random.org.

Good luck!

 Giveaway: Lunch Hour Wool Minis by Kathy Brown
Posted in Book Giveaways | Tagged , , , , | 46 Comments

Serger School: Serging Sheers

Serging shears can be intimidating for beginner and even advanced sewists.  Some of our favorite summer-weight fabrics can be problematic to serge. From silk-feel to rayons and gauze, to linen, lawn and voile, we love them all but those lovely fabrics can be tricky to sew and serger with. Use these tips for maximum serging success.Screen Shot 2019 06 10 at 3.31.53 PM Serger School: Serging Sheers

Screen Shot 2019 06 10 at 3.32.38 PM Serger School: Serging SheersSilk & Rayon

To avoid slippage issues and puckered seams, try the following:

Loosen your presser foot’s screw adjustment, allowing the fabric to feed through without any drag.

Dial down your differential feed to a minus setting, causing the rear feed dogs to pull the fabric through faster than the front feed dogs allow it to proceed. If your machine doesn’t feature differential feed, hold your fabric taut in front of and behind the presser foot while feeding it into the machine. If needed, try a combination of these techniques for best results.

To avoid puckered seams, select the smallest needle size suitable for your serger, depending on your fabric weight.

Some fabrics are too soft to lie flat in a wide tunnel of thread. Seam widths of 2 or narrower will help avoid the rippling effect.

Loosen tensions slightly to avoid puckering on rolled-edge seams.

To avoid serged seams from showing through after pressing, avoid pressing directly on seams or try lighter-weight threads, such as rayon and wooly stretch nylon.

Screen Shot 2019 06 10 at 3.32.43 PM Serger School: Serging Sheers

Sheers

To avoid skipped stitches on sheer fabrics such as georgette, chiffon and organza, pretreat the fabric or dampen the fabric edges (washable fabrics only) with a light mist of water before construction. For added stabilization, apply a liquid fabric stabilizer and allow it to dry before serging.

Use new, small needles to avoid snagging.

Ensure that the serger knives are sharp and clean to avoid uneven cutting, which is crucial on lightweight fabrics.

Test seams and seam finishes on garment fabric scraps before beginning construction.

To prevent puckering, set your serger’s differential feed to 0.7 and/or use taut sewing (by holding the fabric in front of and behind the presser foot) while serging.

Prevent the fabric from slipping by holding the thread chain securely when beginning to serge.

If the serging pulls off the fabric edge, widen and/or lengthen the stitch.

Screen Shot 2019 06 10 at 3.32.50 PM Serger School: Serging Sheers

Lycra

Begin your project with a new needle , size 9/65 or 11/80. A dull needle will leave holes along the needle line.

If a ballpoint needle is available for your machine, consider that option.

Opt for serger, all-purpose or wooly stretch nylon thread. Woolly stretch nylon thread in the needle will allow for additional stretch in the serged stitch; loosen any tensions where this thread is used.

Use a medium- to wide-width and medium- to long-length balanced 3- or 3/4-thread stitch for seaming and finishing.

Test-stretch a serged sample to determine the correct tensions. If the thread breaks when the seam is stretched significantly, loosen the needle thread tension slightly or stretch slightly while serging.

Screen Shot 2019 06 10 at 3.32.54 PM Serger School: Serging SheersLace

Do not press lace until after fitting, then press lightly as needed.

Trim darts by serge-finishing next to the stitching line, from the widest to narrowest point, knotting the thread chain at the point (1).

Use a new size 11 (70 or 75) needle with a short stitch length and differential feed at a minus-setting to prevent puckering. For the least visibility, use a lightweight (No. 80) monofilament-nylon thread in the upper looper for a 3-thread serger stitch and in the needle for conventional topstitching.

Seaming options include a narrow, balanced, serged French or rolled edge, placing right or wrong sides together (try widening a rolled edge stitch width to allow the lace to roll completely).

Janome of America provided the AT2000D serger.

 Serger School: Serging Sheers
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And the Winner of the Wabi-Sabi Sewing Giveaway is…

Carla!

Congratulations, Carla! We’ll be in touch soon so we can get your prize in the mail to you.

Wabi sabi sewing 787x1024 And the Winner of the Wabi Sabi Sewing Giveaway is...

If you didn’t win this time but are still interested in the book, you can find Wabi-Sabi Sewing at interweave.com.

Look for our next book giveaway on July 11. 2019!

 And the Winner of the Wabi Sabi Sewing Giveaway is...
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Giveaway: Wabi-Sabi Sewing by Karen Lewis

It’s giveaway time!

We’re giving away a copy of Wabi-Sabi Sewing by Karen Lewis, as seen in the April/May 2019 issue of Sew News:

Wabi sabi sewing 230x300 Giveaway: Wabi Sabi Sewing by Karen LewisCreate perfectly imperfect projects inspired by the wabi-sabi ethos of finding beauty in the ordinary and imperfect and repairing rather than discarding. Turn scraps of mismatched fabrics into beautiful quilts; extend the life of your favorite jeans with visible mending; embellish a linen pillowcase with sashiko-style stitching and enjoy the slow art of English paper piecing with this compilation of beautiful projects.

For your chance to win a copy of Wabi-Sabi Sewing, leave a comment on this post between now and Monday, May 6, at noon Mountain Daylight Time. We’ll randomly pick a winner from among the commenters Monday afternoon using Random.org.

Good luck!

 Giveaway: Wabi Sabi Sewing by Karen Lewis
Posted in Free Projects | Tagged | 24 Comments

Decorative Effects with Your Serger

If you’re only using your serger for construction, you’re not taking full advantage of everything it can do. Learn more about a variety of decorative techniques, garment details and finishes that your serger can help you achieve.

Cover Pro 2000 CPX 02 Decorative Effects with Your Sergerchemistik partner logo janome 2 300x105 Decorative Effects with Your SergerSome sergers handle specialty techniques and thread better than others. Familiarize yourself with your serger’s capabilities and practice each technique thoroughly to get the most out of the machine and the best results. Specialty techniques are often a juggling act of manipulating fabric and several other components while also avoiding pins.

Gathering 

Gathering using a serger is a snap, even if you don’t have a gathering foot. This technique works best on light- to mediumweight fabrics. Use a sewing machine to gather heavyweight or stiff fabrics.

Screen Shot 2019 04 01 at 10.17.04 AM 300x181 Decorative Effects with Your Serger

Machine set-up: 4-thread overlock stitch

Differential feed: 2.0

Stitch length: longest possible

Stitch finger: engaged

Knife: engaged

Upper and lower looper tension: 1.0 or normal

Needle tension: 6 to 8

Test-serge to determine how much fabric to allow for gathering (multiply the desired finished length by 2 to 2 1⁄2, depending on the desired ruffle fullness).

Overlock the fabric edge, trimming off the desired amount. When the differential feed is above 1 (or normal, depending on the serger make and model), the front feed dogs feed fabric faster than the back feed dogs, causing the fabric to gather.

Leave a 12” thread chain at the stitching beginning and end to loosen gathers if necessary. Pull the needle threads or raise the needle tension for more gathering.

TIP: Use decorative thread in the upper looper and matching or coordinating serger thread in the right needle and lower looper for an extra decorative touch.

Covered Elastic Loops 

Thread loops are fragile, especially if used at a stress point on a garment or on a heavy tote bag. Plain elastic loops are stretchy and durable but not very pretty. Jazz them up with this easy technique for a unique and functional embellishment.

Screen Shot 2019 04 01 at 10.18.31 AM Decorative Effects with Your Serger

Machine set-up: 3-thread rolled hemstitch

Differential feed: 1.0 or normal

Stitch length: 1.0 to 2.0

Stitch finger: disengaged

Knife: locked

Upper looper tension: 2.0

Lower looper tension: 7.0

Right needle tension: normal

Use 1⁄8”-wide flat elastic for the loops. Adjust the serger so the rolled hemstitch is slightly wider than normal. Place the needle in the left overlock position with the thread through the right needle route. Experiment with stitch length to achieve the desired look.

Use heavyweight decorative thread in the upper looper for a beautiful embellishment. Don’t use rayon embroidery thread in the loopers, as it’s not durable enough. If available, use an elastic presser foot for better control than a standard foot.

For multiple loops, use one elastic length equal to the desired loop lengths, plus seam allowances. Don’t stretch the elastic as you stitch. If using an elastic foot, loosen the knob to eliminate stretching as it feeds through and adjust the guide to feed the elastic to the right of the needle.

Insert the elastic into the elastic foot guide or under the standard foot to the right of the needle with at least 2” behind the foot to grasp while stitching. Cover the entire elastic length with stitches, as per the wired ribbon instructions. The thread thickness determines the elastic coverage. If stitches bunch up or stack on the elastic, lengthen the stitch and gently pull some of the stitches off the elastic end. Smooth the stitches until they lay flat and fully cover the elastic. If the elastic shows through the stitches, shorten the stitch length. Cut the elastic to the desired button-loop length and stitch onto the project in the same manner as thread loops.

Serger Braid Trim 

Make custom trim using  serger chain in the desired color. Create braid trim by stitching three components and joining them together: a center band, which is stitched over a filler, such as yarn or narrow ribbon, and two serger chains.

Screen Shot 2019 04 01 at 10.20.24 AM 300x258 Decorative Effects with Your Serger

Serger Braid Trim

Center Band

Machine Setup: 3-thread rolled hem

Differential feed: 1.0 or normal

Stitch length: 1.0 to 2.0

Stitch finger: disengaged

Knife: locked

Upper looper tension: 2.0

Lower looper tension: 7.0

Right needle tension: normal

For a 1⁄8”-wide center band, adjust the rolled hemstitch slightly wider than normal. Place the needle in the left overlock position with the thread through the right needle path.

Thread the upper looper with decorative thread and the needle and lower looper with matching or coordinating thread. If available, use an elastic foot to easily feed the filler through the serger. Or manually hold the filler to the right of needle so the thread wraps around it during stitching.

Chain Stitches

Use heavyweight decorative thread in the loopers for a beautiful chain. Experiment with a variety of thread to achieve the desired look.

Machine set up: 3-thread rolled hem

Differential feed: 1.0 or normal

Stitch length: 1.5

Knife: engaged

Stitch finger: engaged

Right needle tension: normal

Upper looper: 2.0

Lower looper: 7.0

Engage the stitch finger to widen the stitch slightly and create an open, lacy chain.

Stitch a chain twice the length of the center band. Press the chain using steam, stretching slightly to smooth and evenly distribute the stitches.

Following the manufacturer’s instructions, fuse a 1⁄2”-wide strip of double-sided fusible web onto the base fabric according to the center-band length and desired placement. Center the band over the fusible web; finger-press firmly. Abut the thread chains against each center-band long edge. Reposition the components as necessary. When satisfied with the placement, press the components to secure.

Thread the sewing machine needle with monofilament thread and the bobbin with all-purpose thread. Loosen the upper tension slightly to prevent puckering the trim when couching. Select a 2mm-long zigzag stitch on the widest setting. Couch the trim onto
the base fabric. If the widest zigzag setting doesn’t catch all three components, zigzag stitch the center band, and then straight stitch the thread chain edges using a 3.5mm-long stitch.

Stitch or fuse the trim onto base fabric and combine with hot-fix crystals or other embellishments, if desired.

3-Thread Reverse Flatlock 

Use this technique to join two abutted fabric edges or along a fold of one fabric piece. Stitch with the fabric fold just to the left of the locked blade. Experiment with different stitch lengths to achieve the desired look.

Screen Shot 2019 04 01 at 10.21.24 AM Decorative Effects with Your Serger

Thread Reverse Flatlock

Left needle tension: 0 or bypass tension disk

Upper looper tension: 1.0

Lower looper tension: 7.0

Differential feed: 1.0 or normal

Knife: disengaged (optional)

Stitch length: 1.5 to 4.0

Use heavyweight decorative thread in the needle to create bold “ladders.” A topstitch needle has a longer eye and deeper groove to accommodate hefty threads. Some sergers have a 2-thread flatlock and reverse flatlock stitch feature. Check the machine manual for the machine set-up.

With right sides together, stitch the seam. Open the seam and gently pull both fabric pieces to flatten and reveal the stitching. Press to smooth the fabric.

Weave ribbon, embroidery floss or other decorative fiber through the exposed stitches, if desired. Using a double-eye needle or bodkin, weave two pieces of narrow floss through the same seam to lend visual complexity to any project. Alternate the weaving pattern for different effects.

Screen Shot 2019 04 01 at 10.22.13 AM 281x300 Decorative Effects with Your Serger

Ribbon in flat lock stitching

chemistik partner logo janome 2 300x105 Decorative Effects with Your Serger

Janome of America provided the CoverPro 2000CPX serger.

 Decorative Effects with Your Serger
Posted in Tips & Techniques | Tagged , | 1 Comment

And the Winner of the Big Embroidery Giveaway Is…

Bev!

Congratulations, Bev! We’ll be in touch soon so we can get your prize in the mail to you.

(For everyone who entered the contest, I’m so sorry for the delay. I somehow managed to completely forget I hadn’t picked a winner yet!)

Big Embroidery 965x1024 And the Winner of the Big Embroidery Giveaway Is…

 

If you didn’t win this time but are still interested in the book, you can find Big Embroidery at Interweave.com.

Look for our next book giveaway on May 1, 2019!

 And the Winner of the Big Embroidery Giveaway Is…
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Giveaway: Big Embroidery by Nancy Nicholson

It’s giveaway time!

Big Embroidery 282x300 Giveaway: Big Embroidery by Nancy NicholsonWe’re giving away a copy of Big Embroidery by Nancy Nicholson, as seen in the February/March 2019 issue of Sew News:

Get beautiful results using different types of yarn and fabric, including upholstery fabrics, woolens and tweeds to create a collection of stunning quick-to-stitch projects.

Choose from home decor items such as cushions, bags, wall hangings and table runners, as well as ideas for embellishing clothing. Learn how to create all the key embroidery stitches with a stitch library featuring easy-to-follow diagrams of all the basic crewel embroidery stitches in detail.

For your chance to win a copy of Big Embroidery, leave a comment on this post between now and Monday, March 11, at noon Mountain Daylight Time. We’ll randomly pick a winner from among the commenters Friday afternoon using Random.org.

Good luck!

 Giveaway: Big Embroidery by Nancy Nicholson
Posted in Book Giveaways | Tagged | 41 Comments

Serger Maintenance and Tension Tips

Learning basic serger maintenance and tension tips may increase the life of your serger, and keep your projects looking their best. Read today’s post for important tips and tricks for keeping your machine running in tip-top shape.

As with any piece of mechanical equipment, the life of a serger and the quality of its performance are greatly enhanced by regular care, maintenance and some basic troubleshooting knowledge.

Screen Shot 2019 02 04 at 10.38.31 AM Serger Maintenance and Tension Tips

Basic Serger Maintenance

The good news is that sergers are relatively simple to care for. It only takes a few minutes to keep them running well. Follow these steps for cleaning and oiling your serger to make sure it’s ready for the next sewing project.

Clean the serger on a regular basis. Some fabrics create a great deal of lint and fuzz; these require more frequent serger cleanings. Others are relatively lint-free, meaning the serger can go longer between cleanings. It’s also a good idea to have it professionally cleaned and checked by a trained technician every one to two years.

Gather a few tools to help the process go quickly and smoothly. Some of these tools may be included with the serger while others are common household items: lint brush, oil, tweezers, pipe cleaners, soft cloth, owner’s manual, needle holder if
applicable, small screwdriver and vacuum (optional).

For deep cleaning, unthread the machine and remove the presser foot and needles. Some models may also allow the removal of the throat plate. Open both doors of the serger for full access to the loopers.

Using a soft brush, such as a paintbrush, lint brush or make-up brush, clean the lower area of the serger. Remove all lint from the loopers and the feed dog area. A brush that has stiff bristles is also useful in certain areas to push lint out of the machine. Pull long threads from the machine using tweezers if needed.

Use a pipe cleaner for hard-to-reach areas. The stiffness of the cleaner paired with its flexibility allows it to snake into areas too small for hands. The texture of the pipe cleaner acts as a dust catcher to remove lint.

Use a small vacuum or vacuum attachment to remove lint quickly. Canned compressed air isn’t usually recommended, as it blows lint into the machine rather than out of it. This can potentially build up inside the serger, causing difficulty for the moving parts.

After cleaning the looper area, oil the needed areas using the type of oil recommended by the serger manufacturer. Generally, oil is applied where metal moves against metal. Only small amounts are needed, usually one or two drops at each point.

Floss the tension dials using a length of embroidery floss or Perle cotton. This clears the area of lint and cleans out any bits of thread caught in the tension dials. Build-up here is especially troublesome because it can affect the accuracy of the tension setting and interfere with stitch formation.

Replace the knife if needed. It’s easy to tell when the knife needs replacing because the fabric has a chewed look rather than a clean edge after passing under the knife. Some sergers have one knife and others have two, featuring an upper and a lower blade. The knife can be changed with a simple process; however, a trained serger technician should replace the knife because of the precise positioning it needs to operate correctly.

Replace the presser foot and the stitch plate, if it was removed. Always insert a new needle after each cleaning session. Lastly, wipe off the outside of the serger to remove any smudges or fingerprints.

Tension Troubleshooting 101

It’s possible that cleaning your serger well and regularly will help you resolve and avoid common issues. However, if you’re still experiencing skipped stitches, tension troubles and loose, loopy stitches, try the steps outlined below.

If your serger is skipping stitches, try a variety of solutions to correct the issue.

Make sure the needles are securely inserted and properly positioned. The needles should be inserted as far into their sockets as possible and their positions should be slightly offset.

Change the needles every time you begin a new project. An old needle may have burrs or other imperfections that aren’t visible to the naked eye.

Check the looper tensions to determine if they’re correctly set for the selected stitch.

Reposition the thread. Switch the thread from the loopers to the needles and vice versa.

Make small repairs to a seam that has skipped stitches using a hand sewing needle and clear monofilament thread.

Screen Shot 2019 02 04 at 10.40.03 AM Serger Maintenance and Tension Tips

The stitch samples were created using yellow thread in the left needle, blue thread in the right needle, red thread in the upper looper and green thread in the lower looper.

Tension is another potential trouble spot when serging. When the stitch is balanced, the fabric edge lays completely flat (2). If the serged stitch is causing the edge to curl or fold, adjust the lopper tension settings.

If the fabric curls toward the right side, the upper looper tension may be too tight (3). Loosen the upper looper tension slightly and then test-serge on a fabric scrap. The lower looper tension may need to be tightened to compensate and produce a balanced stitch.

If the fabric curls toward the wrong side, the lower looper tension may be too tight (4). Loosen the lower looper tension slightly and then test-serge on a fabric scrap. the upper looper tension may need to be tightened to compensate and produce a balanced stitch.

If the serger produces a loose stitch with pronounced thread loops, the thread may not be securely placed through the tension disks. When this happens, the needle causes small thread loops to appear on the fabric wrong side (5). This also makes the serged seam weak and prone to stretching. To alleviate this problem, make sure that the needle threads are snuggly seated within the tension disks. Also check the threading diagram in your serger manual to ensure that you’ve followed the thread paths as directed.

janome serger 300x150 Serger Maintenance and Tension Tips

Janome of America provided the AT2000D serger.

 Serger Maintenance and Tension Tips
Posted in Tips & Techniques | Tagged , | 2 Comments

And the Winner of the Sew Luxe Leather Giveaway Is…

Leslie!

Congratulations, Leslie! We’ll be in touch soon so we can get your prize in the mail to you.

Sew Luxe Leather 5inch 300dpi 965x1024 And the Winner of the Sew Luxe Leather Giveaway Is...

If you didn’t win this time but are still interested in the book, you can find Sew Luxe Leather at interweave.com.

Look for our next book giveaway on March 7, 2019!

 And the Winner of the Sew Luxe Leather Giveaway Is...
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Giveaway: Sew Luxe Leather by Rosanna Clare Gethin

It’s giveaway time!

Sew Luxe Leather 5inch 300dpi 283x300 Giveaway: Sew Luxe Leather by Rosanna Clare GethinWe’re giving away a copy of Sew Luxe Leather by Rosanna Clare Gethin, as seen in the December 2018/January 2019 issue of Sew News:

With just a few basic tools, you can create chic fashion-forward leather items in no time. Choose from a wide range of 20 exciting accessories including hand-stitched, machine sewn and no-sew projects. This book features all the essential leather craft techniques, from scoring and hole punching to embossing and burnishing.

For your chance to win a copy of Sew Luxe Leather, leave a comment on this post between now and Monday, January 6, at noon Mountain Standard Time. We’ll randomly pick a winner from among the commenters Monday afternoon using Random.org.

Good luck!

 Giveaway: Sew Luxe Leather by Rosanna Clare Gethin
Posted in Book Giveaways | Tagged | 18 Comments

Common Serger Feet & How to Use Them

A serger isn’t just for finishing raw edges. Learn about useful serger presser feet that take your sewing to the next level and help you take full advantage of everything your serger can do. Note: The featured serger feet imagery are for Janome sergers.

Blind Hem Foo

Blind Hem Serger Foot Common Serger Feet & How to Use Them

Use a blind hem foot to create an invisible hem on a garment or home-décor project.

Fold the fabric toward the wrong side to the desired hem width. Fold the fabric with right sides together, exposing a scant 1⁄2” of the raw edge. Position the fabric wrong side up beneath the foot.

Select a 2- or 3-thread narrow hem stitch on the machine. Slowly lower the needle into the fabric to check the needle placement. The left needle should barely graze the hem, catching one or two fibers. The foot-edge guide should be flush with the fabric fold. With the knife blade up, serge the hem, making sure to only cut off the fabric raw edge, catching the fold within the stitching. Press open the seam. Continue reading

 Common Serger Feet & How to Use Them
Posted in Tips & Techniques | Tagged | 3 Comments

Holiday Parties, Sequins & Sheers: New Issue of Sew News is here (and full of hacks!)

newissue1901 300x300 Holiday Parties, Sequins & Sheers: New Issue of Sew News is here (and full of hacks!)The December 18/January 19 issue of Sew News is fondly referred to (around here!) as the holiday hack issue! Seriously, this issue is big and beefy and inspiring, especially if you’re in the mood for a little #sewfrosting. But don’t worry, plenty of cake, too, that will get you through the holidays and beyond.

One of my favorite elements is a selection of three articles, each featuring three pattern hacks for wardrobe basics: a raglan sweatshirt (looking at you, Linden Sweatshirt), a drop shoulder blouse and a jacket. The hacks are designed to help you get maximum potential out of patterns you already have in your pattern library and turn an everyday pattern into something special for the holidays. Continue reading

 Holiday Parties, Sequins & Sheers: New Issue of Sew News is here (and full of hacks!)
Posted in Events, Uncategorized | Tagged | 3 Comments

And the Winner of the My Doll, My Style Giveaway Is…

Peggy K!

Congratulations, Peggy! We’ll be in touch soon so we can get your prize in the mail to you.

My Doll My Style 800x1024 And the Winner of the My Doll, My Style Giveaway Is...

If you didn’t win this time but are still interested in the book, you can find My Doll, My Style at interweave.com.

Look for our next book giveaway on January 3, 2019!

 And the Winner of the My Doll, My Style Giveaway Is...
Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Giveaway: My Doll, My Style by Anna Allen

It’s giveaway time!

We’re giving away a copy of My Doll, My Style by Anna Allen, as seen in the October/November 2018 issue of Sew News:

My Doll My Style 234x300 Giveaway: My Doll, My Style by Anna AllenDiscover how fun and easy it is to make custom, on-trend doll fashions the child in your life will love. Designer and Doll It Up blogger Anna Allen shows you how to create runway-worthy looks for 18” dolls. From jeggings and dresses to shorts and tees, each pattern is designed for today’s fashion fabrics with a modern aesthetic and fit.

For your chance to win a copy of My Doll, My Style, leave a comment on this post between now and Friday, November 8, at noon Mountain Standard Time. We’ll randomly pick a winner from among the commenters Friday afternoon using Random.org.

Good luck!

 Giveaway: My Doll, My Style by Anna Allen
Posted in Book Giveaways | 26 Comments